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REFLECTOR 

1939 




WEYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 

WEYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 



The Reflector is published by students of Weymouth 
High School, Weymouth Massachusetts. Editor Anne 
Toomey; Business Manager, Ralph Sweeney; Faculty 
Advisor, Prescott B. Brown, Printed by Students of the 
Printing Department, Weymouth Vocational School. 



JAN 1 2 84 



THE TUFTS LlBRARt \ 
y/EYMOUTH, MASS. 



In grateful appreciation of the untiring work of one 
who, during twenty-five years of service as a teacher at 
the Weymouth High School, has constantly aided the 
students with his kind assistance and helpful advice, 
we the Class of 1939, dedicate this Year Book to Mr. 
Prescott B. Brown, Faculty Adviser of the Reflector. 



Class Poem 



Against the bright horizon of life, 



Where land and sl<y divide, 
Stands n mighty golden gate 
Which we must open wide. 



Beyond iho.se gleaming pot tills 

Lies something more precious than gold-— 

Success, the reward of endeavor, 

Which ice must attain and hold. 

Shall we tarry slowly behind, 
And content ourselves to stay 
On a j>alli thai offers no promise. 

And where failure holds its sway? 

No! Let us press onward and upward, 
Until the gates swing open wide, 
And, from the generous hand of lime, 
We find the treasure stored inside. 



Cornelia Bowie 
Marguerite Howsberger 



Four-Year Honor Roll 



Theresa Cassese 
Ellen Coyle 



Lenna Palmer 



CONCETTA PASSERO 



Mary Lam be 



Laura Passero 



Rose Lipsky 



Pall Roche 



Ingrid Monk 



Anne Toomey 



Ruth Trenear 



convenes 




Dedication 



Class Poem and Four Year Honor Roll 
Faculty Notes . 

Class Officers 

Vocational Officers . 
Salutatory Address . 



Valedictory Address 



Class History- 



Class Prophecy 



Senior Section and Who's Who 



Class Census 



12 



13 



21 



39 
83 



School Activities 85 

Class Will 107 

Baby Parade 108 

Autographs . • no 

Advertisements 1 1 1 

7 



FACULTY 



WALLACE L. WHIT 

Our leader— a man 
standing. 

I NOMAS A. LYONS. Assistant Principal 
Virtuous and wise he is, but not severe; 
lie \!ill remembers thai he mice was young. 

VELMA E. ABBOTT, Clerk 
A I tie int to all. 

HARRY ARLANSON, Coach, Mai hematics, 
St ience 

Competence, sincerity, sportsmanship. 

PAUL H. BATES, French 

"So hit the line for Harvard! For Harvard wins 
to-day!" 

ESTHER L. BENSON, Home Economics 
A noble aim 

Faithfully kepi, is a noble deed. 

BARBARA BICKNELL, Mathematics, Science 
A daughter of the gods, 
Divinely tall, and most divinely fair. 

PRESCOTT B. BROWN, English, History 
It is wisdom thai makes a man rich. 

ERNESTINE R. CANNING, French 

That which she teaches is never forgotten. 

PAUL C. CLEAVES, English 

Too wise to err, too good to be unkind. 

MARIE E. CONROY, French 

What lies beyond that quiet exterior? 

JOHN K. DELAHUNT, Economics, Science 
T'is good to be merry and wise. 

BEATRICE ESCOTT, Home Economics 
Her modesty's a candle to her merit. 

ALICE K. FAY, Commercial 
M auled: a secretary? 
Cool, calm, and collected. 



LE, Principal 

of -wisdom and iindcr- 

ELEANOR FREEMAN, English, German 
She has a voice of gladness and a smile. 

JOHN T. GANNON, Latin 

For he is full of fun, wit, and fire. 

JOHN T. GHIORSE. English, History, Science 
Music, maestro, please! 

SHEILA M. GROSS, Librarian 

Her manner quiet and her nature mild. 

WALT ER C. GUTTERSON, Citizenship, Eng- 
lish, History 

The forte of his own merit makes his way. 

OLIVE E. HACKETT, Commercial 
Accuracy is her password. 

K.ATHERINE M. HALE, English, History Sci- 
ence 

"Well, there's another factor entering in." 

INF./ E. HOAG, Physical Education 
A merry heart to cheer us on. 

EVERETT N. HOLLIS, Commercial 

"Does anyone know the answer to this riddle?" 

LILLIAN J EFTS, Spanish 

"Who gave you girls permission to talk?" 

DOROTHY A. JENKINS, Commercial 
Laugh and the world laughs with you. 

PHILIP T. JONES, Commercial 
See there a man, diligent in his business. 

FRANCIS X. KELLY, Commercial 
Let us then be up and doing, 
With a heart for any faith. 



First Row: Mr. Stewart. Mr. Whipple, Mr. Whittle. Mr. Lyons, Mr. Martin, Mr. Gannon; Second Row: Mr. 
Brown, Miss Silverman, Miss White. Mrs. White, Miss Skala. Miss Petrucci, Miss Peterson. Miss Vining, Mr. 
Loud; Third Row: Miss Hale, Miss Conroy. Miss Stockwell, Miss Lyons, Miss Canning, Miss McMorrow, Miss 
Sheehan. Miss Silvester; Fourth Row: Miss Reidy, Miss Jenkins, Miss Benson, Miss Jefts, Miss Langford, Miss 
Hoag. Miss Freeman; Fifth Row: Mr. Nelson, Miss Madigan. Miss Fav, Miss Nye, Miss MacGregor, Miss 
Bicknell, Mr. Hollis; Sixth Row: Mr. Kelly, Miss Gross, Miss Abbott, Miss Young, Miss Escott. Mr. Page; 
Seventh Row: Mr. Clarke, Mr. Sherwood, Mr. Raymond, Mr. J. Nelson. Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Bates; Eighth Row: 
Mr. Mahn, Mr. Swan, Mr. Parker. Mr. Jones, Mr. Gutterson. Mr. Delahunt; Ninth Row: Mr. Duncan, Mr. 
McCarthy. Mr. Ghiorse, Mr. Cleaves, Mr. Steele, Mr. Sturtevant; Tenth Row: Mr. Whittemore, Mr. 
Bryan, Mr. Bacon, Mr. Booth. Mr. Lyond. 



9 



\I VRGARET K. LANGFORD, Commercial 
A sunny smile mid a sweei personality are 
treasured by all. 

NORMAN I). LOUD, Science 

Music touches every hey of memory. 

CLARENCE R. LYOND, Science 
A pound of pluck is.worth a ton of luck. 

HELEN G. LYONS, English, History 
The truly generous is the truly wise, 
And she who helps others lives blest. 

DOROTHY (.. MACGREGOR, Commercial 
Constant as the northern slat. 

ELI \NOR R. MADIGAN, Commerical 

Beauty and charm, intellect and understand- 
ing—a rare combination. 

JOHN F. M VR I IN. History, Latin 

Cheerfulness wins friends wherever it goes. 

GEORGE |. MCCARTHY, Commercial 
t he light heart is the happy heat I. 

MARY E. Mc MORROW. English 
Diligence is the keynote of success. 

ROBER I E. MITCHELL, Commercial 
Speech is silver; silence is golden. 

HI 1 I N M. NORRIS, Commercial 

The noblest mind the best contentment lias. 

VIRGINIA NYE, English 

Hen- is my hand ]oi true constancy. 

ORAL A. PAGE, Physcial Education 

There is nothing so strong and safe as the 
ti nth. 



DOROTHY L. PETERSON, Physcial Education 
Het eyes are laughing, her smile winning, 

AN1 I A L. PE1 RUCCI, English. French 
She has a sunny smile. 

VIA All RAYMOND, Mathematics, Science 
A standing (harder worth his weight in gold. 

Ill I I \ \ F. REIDY, Latin 

She lends ( harm wherever she is. 

SUSAN G. SHEEHAN, English. Mathematics 
Patience is the hey of contentment . 

I VI I A N SI 1 A I S I I R. Drawing 
A soft answer tumeth away wrath. 

EVA SKALA, Home Economics 
" Ellen 's no more hrown bread." 

| WII-.S F. STEELE, English. History 
Always willing, to lend a helping hand. 

ROSE SILVERMAN, Commercial 
The cautious seldom err. 

GEORGE o. s i EWART, Mathematics 
•It's the English!" 

Ill BI R I A L. STOCKWELL, Nurse 
Is soothing and kind as she can be. 

MARTHA VINING, Latin 
Her patience is everlasting. 

VLICE WHITE, English 

Uways ready and willing to help. 

DOR \ s. will I I .(Mrs.) English, History 

She is everyone's friend, and is held high in 
our esteem. 

\\ [EAN YOUNG Commercial 
Quiet and understanding. 



Vocational School 



FR \NCIS E. WHIPPLE, Diret toi 
Always at it wins the tlay. 

LEWIS H. BACON. JR. Auto Mechanics 
Brevity is the soul of wit. 

[AMES A. BOO! H. JR. Sheet Metal 
A good 'worker and a friend well worth having. 

I) EVERETT BRYAN, Auto Mechanics 

Value the friendship of him who stands by the 

storm. 

HAROLD F. CLARKE. Sheet Metal 
A m -riy heart goes all the day. 

HARRY F. DUNCAN, Printing, Placement 

Who has much knowledge and a keen wit. 



OTTO H. MAHN, Punting 

He is a wise man who speaks little. 

| VLM \R N. NELSON, Mathematics 
He's quite the actor. 

R \Y G. PARKER, Met ha nil a! Drawing 
"Please he quiet." 

II > ROLD C. SHERWOOD, Cabinet making 
By one's work we know the -workman. 

WALDO H. SWAN. English. Science 
I quiet mind is richer than a crown. 

JOSEPH K. WHITTEMORE, Citizenship. Eng- 
lish, History 
A cheerful spirit is Heaven's own gift. 



Agricultural School 



HILMER S. NELSON. Director JACK STURTEVANT, Assistant 

The "Aggie" room progresses wonderfully un- A quiet tongue shows a wise head, 
der his management. 



lO 




PRESTON BARRY. First Vice-President RALPH HUNTER. Second Vice-President 

PAUL ROCHE. President 

MARGUERITE STARKEY. Treasurer LENNA PALMER, Secretary 




Anne Gertrude Toomey 



This Is Our Life 



Wi . mi Ci vss of 1939, cordially welcome all who are present here on this 
our Graduation Da) . 

Mothers and fathers, it is with a deep sense ol gratitude and affection that 
we greet you. We realize thai it is your understanding guidance and your many 
sacrifices that make this happy da) possible. 

Mr. Pearson and members ol the School Committee, we are proud of the 
Weymouth system ol education, which has given us such excellent advantages 
.iikI opportunities. May we extend to you our heart-fell appreciation. 

Mr. Whittle and members oi the faculty, we shall never forget the interest 
you have shown in our work during our lour years at Weymouth High School. 

1 he story ol man's life is the story of his exceptional achievement. Step In 
slep we have been able to unearth his life's narrative by the discovery of what he 
has done in the past. From the savage stage to the barbaric, bom the barbaric 
stage to the dawn ol civilization, bom the dawn ol civilization to the present 
time, we arc' able to unfold a siorv that far exceeds the greatest fairy tale ever 
vvri 1 ten. 

in the beginning, man's exploits were simple, just as his life was simple. 

lodav his leais arc startling; but, startling as they have been, (hose which he 
will accomplish will be more so. This seems as certain as time itself, tor history 
has repeatedl) shown us thai man's progress is never complete. It is like a winding 
river thai moves toward the sea, sometimes placidl) through the shady glens ol 
peace and understanding, sometimes unbulently over the cascades of war and 
ignorance, bin always progressing. 

That man has advanced we surely must agree. Scientifically his progress has 
been phenomenal. As a result, his intellect has become keener and more alert to 
changes about him. But has his emotional development kepi pace with his scien- 
tific development? The problem presented bv this question must be acknow- 
ledged, lis answer is found in the story of his life. 

f.et us begin our story with Cro-Magnon man. who lived about the year 
25,000 B.C. This man lived a lile ol comparative freedom. W ithout a government, 
he roamed (he countryside, seeking his lood stipplv. To obtain shelter from (he 
wild beasts and the elements he- used a cave. Here he raised his family; here 
he taught his children slriel obedience; here he taught them the law ol self-preser- 
vation, the law bv which the Cro Magnons lived. 

In the succeeding years, as his fruit supply began to decrease and the number 
of people who were calling upon this natural supply continued to increase, lie 
was laced with one ol his first great problems— that ol replenishing hi. lood 
supply. He solved it by culling a stone weapon to In his hand. Willi this he 
killed small animals. What a field of opportunity he had opened to himself! 
Before long he attached a handle to the stone so that he could strike harder and 
kill larger animals. Man, guided by his intellect, had started to progress. 

Cro-Magnon man's successor remained in this barbaric stage for thousands 
of years. He changed his place of abenle from the cave to a shelter made of skins, 
and later to a wooden hut. He developed a simple govrnment in which the father 
of the family conducted the religious worship and made the laws for the house- 
hold. One thing he kept with him, his lust to kill, but this lust did not confine 
itself to animals. Often, when he saw another man with something he desired, he 



14 



killed to obtain it. One day he discovered fire, and with it the key to unlock the 
door to civilization. 

The next chapter in man's stor) lakes us to the banks of the Nile. Man had 
settled in Egypt because the land was fertile and food could be obtained without 
wandering. Here, amid scenes of peace and contentment, the Egyptian laid the 
foundation of future civilization. Three thousand years before the French 
engineer, DeLesseps, had completed the present Suez Canal, the Egyptians con- 
structed the first Suez Canal. The Pyramids, the Sphinx, and the Hall of Karnak 
bear testimoney to his great architectural achievements. Writings, art, medicine, 
science, engineering, government, all these he developed and left to us. 

But Egyptian civilization declined. First, it was the harsh treatment of the 
slaves and the degradation of the poorer class that caused unrest. Next, it was 
the invasion of the Shepherd Kings, to defeat whom the Egyptians developed 
men that were trained in the art ol war. With these men at her disposal, Egypt 
became a conquering nation because the ruling class would not apply scientific 
intelligence to a moral code that would guide the destinies of the government in 
peace and contentment. In the sixth century B.C. Egypt fell into the hands of the 
Persians, and her progress stopped. 

The next chapter of man's life is taken from the history of Rome. Rome's 
rise to power was largely the result of intelligence used in handling its citizens. 
She gave them a system of laws whereby they were treated justly. She recognized 
the need of a healthy people; so aqueducts were built to carry a pure water supply 
to Rome, games were instituted to develop the beaches, and public baths were 
introduced to insure cleanliness. 

To all the advantages received from such an administration, man countered 
with greater works, splendid roads which are in evidence to-day, remarkable 
buildings, and unrivalled works of sculpture. With all this it seems that man 
should have been contented. However, greed seized the leaders of the country; 
and the army, which had been used to put clown revolts, was used to expand 
Rome' power. 

While such expansion brought with it an enriched civilization it had many 
evil results. Individuals grew more wealthy; class distinctions became prominent; 
wealth became the standard b\ which life's success was measured; the just admin- 
istration of laws disappeared. 

These injustices were reflected in Roman life. Heavy taxation, needed to 
support the growing army, drove out the middle class, and the added wealth 
weakened the character of the Romans in power. What was the result? Barbaric 
tendencies made their appearance. Gladiatorial contests were staged lor their 
benefit. Christians were fed to the beasts, or forced to kill each other to satisfy 
their whims and fancies. Thus we see that man's moral and emotional develop- 
ment had not kept pace with his scientific progress, and. not withstanding its 
outward splendor, Rome was perishing from within. She fell before a barbarian 
invador A.D. 476. 

Man and his world did not recover from the shock of the fall of Rome for 
centuries. During the Renaissance he began to patch together fragrants of his 
former greatness. Guilds began to flourish, and with them came social legislation. 
At the same time, however, Europe was torn by a series of wars. Under sane 



*5 



conditions cultural development and destruction would not have gone hand in 
hand. 

The twentieth century has wrought a tremendous change in the world. 
Governments have changed; educational opportunities have been enlarged; medi- 
cine and surgery have gone ahead by leaps and bounds; and science has revolu- 
tionized man's-life. Vet all around us. in this age of advanced civilization, wars 
are being waged. It is the old story of ancient times— the survival of the fittest. 

Will man continue to destroy man and to undo his great wroks? That is the 
problem which laces ns to-day. The seriousness of the problem was stressed by 
Herbert Hoover in a recent speech when he said, "The tools of industry as well 
;is warfare will destroy this civilization unless they be guided by men of high 
( haracter." 

What should be our answer to this twentieth century challenge? Let us 
answer it in the words of the same statesman: 

"Out of this technology and powe r over nature we must build stability and 
sc< urity for the common man, or fail. Wc must stiffen those elements of character 
and wisdom that will make these forces beneficial and not destructive. It is in 
education, morals, and character of men where our hopes must rest." 

This is the task which lies ahead of us; this is our life. 



C<>\< i 1 1 a Geraldine Passero 



Past, Present, and Future 




ook down upon a busy street, and you will see a world in motion— people 



trucks, buses. In the distance, trains are speeding over the tracks and gliding 



into the station. Even now, an airplane whirrs across the sky. 
You are looking at transportation, to-day stirring chapter in the history ot 
the United States. For our history can be written in many ways— in politics, in 
art, in science— but equally as interesting, it can be written in the terms of travel 
and transportation. 

Let us turn bac k the pages of American history, and learn how our ancestors 
passed from covered wagons to nailer trucks; from canoe to steamboat; 
from stagecoaches to automobiles; from blazed trails to modern highways— always 
going forward with the purpose of bettering mankind by speedier and more 
comfortable methods of transportation. 

From earliest history, men have tended to wander. Quest for adventure has 
ever led them to travel. Desire lor wealth has prompted them to seek means for 
marketing their goods. Eager longing for social contact demanded a more 
efficient means of transportation. 

The first method of travel was "shoe-leather express", except that perhaps 
men had no shoes. Later, man learned to domesticate beasts of burden. The 
discovery ol the wheel naturally was followed by the invention of wheeled 
\ chicles— wagons, coaches, trains, automobiles. And so developed roads. 

However, it was not until 1775 that any concerted attempt wa^ made bv the 
Government to build a road as such. For more than a century, American pioneers 
had been occupied with the task of surviving, and transportation was of no im- 
mediate concern. But the old Indian trails did provide a route for travellers on 
foot and on horseback. W ith the outbreak of the Revolution, however, the need 
for roads was painfully obvious. In 1775. there were only three roads north and 
east from New York, and only one leading west from Philadelphia. General 
Washington found this lack of adecpiate roads as great a handicap in the conduct 
of his war as the lack of material supplies. 

At the time ol Washington's inauguration, anyone really in a hurry went on 
horseback. But. with the advent of the nineteenth century came a new genera- 
tion that lived in the present and looked ahead into the future. Its members were 
eager to move forward with the purpose of bettering their country. Thus, it was 
natural that they demanded internal improvements, especially good roads and 
turnpikes, under Government aid. 

The result of this generation's demands for improvements in transportation 
facilities may be divided into three periods before the Civil War: turnpike and 
improved roads; canals and improved rivers; and railroads. 

Seventeen hundred and ninety-two marked the completion of the famous 
Lancaster Turnpike, the first scientifically-built, hard-surfaced road in the United 
States. 

Shortly after this, the Federal Government came to realize the need for 
more and better roads, and, as a result, the National Road (or, as it was more 
commonly known, the Cumberland Road) was begun in 1811 southwest from 
Cumberland, Maryland. In 1818, it had been completed to Wheeling, West 




Virginia, and, by 1852, it had reached Vandalia, Illinois. In addition to the 
excellence of its construction, the Cumberland Road was noteworthy because of 
the presence of bridges, replacing the old and inconvenient fords. 

In 1807, Robert Fulton's construction of the first successful steamboat in the 
world was the supreme event in the history of water transportation. The steam- 
boat was used chiefly on the rivers, and, consequently, it did not help transporta- 
tion from east to west since all the great rivers of this continent flow from north 
to south. This need for east-to-west transportation led to an era of canal build- 
ing. The first and probably the best-known canal of this period is the Erie Canal. 
This was completed in 1825 between Lake Erie and the Hudson River. 

In 1869, the Union and Central Pacific Railroads were joined by a mahogany 
tie bound with silver, and the last spike, a gold one, was driven. That year (1869) 
was the beginning ot a great era for the railroads. Notable among the advances 
sponsored by the railroads and making for more efficient coast-to-coast travel 
are the penetration of the Continental Divide by the now-famous Moffat Tunnel 
and the bridging of the Mississippi River. 

The railroad was only a small factor in reducing the isolation of our western 
farmer. It remained for the automobile to make country living not only possible 
but desirable. But the coming of the automobile caused a demand for a satis- 
factory road system. As a result, the Federal Government in co-operation with 
state governments built from the Atlantic to the Pacific a great ribbon of white 
winding through eleven states— the 3,000 mile Lincoln Highway. 

For many years, men had thought about flying. They could do the same 
things as fish and animals. Why not imitate birds? It remained for Orville and 
Wilbur Wright to succeed in flying in 1903. They remained in the air approxi- 
mately one minute at a height of 872 feet. This achievement, however small and 
insignificant in comparison with modern aviation accomplishments, was the first 
step in the forward and upward stride in the purpose of conquering the air. 

I he greatest triumph of American engineering skill is the construction of 
(he Panama Canal. For this, a task which the French tried and lailed, will the 
names of Goethals and Gorgas be ever written in the pages of American history. 

Thus, by gradual but forward development, transportation has come to be 
w hat it is. The prosperity of the human race has kept almost equal pace with 
transportation development, for, as Rudyard Kipling so tersely said "Transporta- 
tion is civilization." Without transportation, a nation would die. The roads and 
railways are the arteries of a country, and the traffic that flows along them is the 
blood stream that gives it life. 

Until today, transportation has been on one plane. It was in constant con- 
tact with the earth. We used to stand by a road or look down from an upper 
window to watch the traffic go by. Today, transportation has begun to take to 
the skies. 

Let us peer ahead into the future. Look up. "Workmen flv from job to job. 
Passenger rockets travel to other planets. A trip from the United States to Europe 
in a rocket takes only one hour. Look about you. You do not see any smoky 
railroad yards. Trains use electricity instead of coal. There are few large land- 
ing fields for airplanes in the city, for the autogiro is used for air travel within 



ihe country or from city to city. Ii is difficult i<> predict the future of ships; for, 
ever since primitive man hopped on a log and started the Insi water-transpori 
vehicle, the ship has been the largest passenger-carrying unit in the world. 

Within the span of a lifetime, man has seen isolation banished by transporta- 
tion. The poor man tan take his weary family out ol the noisy <ii\ into the pure 
air and sunshine oi the country, lo the sick, fat from help, the motor vehicle 
I >] ings the doctor qui< kl\ . 

We have come a long wa\ in the progress ol transportation. Vet, we are 
just beginning to learn. We have the whole future before us. 

Mothers and fathers, no words (an express our appreciation and "latitude 
for the opportunities you have given us. Ma\ we prove worth) of the sacrifices 
you have made so that with all our educational advantages we may enjoy a richer 
life. 

Mr. Pearson and members ol the School Committee, we thank you for the 
i welve years ol opportunities which we have enjoyed under your able supen ision. 

Mr. Whittle and teachers, we are deeply grateful for your understanding, 
patience, and kindness. Ma) we pass on to others the best that you have »iven us. 

Classmates, as we learn our high school to-da\ lor the greater school of life, 
let us ever keep in mind our inspiring motto. To-day, unusual conditions exist. 
There is an excess ol material, an excess of money, and an excess of man-power. 
There is not enough work to do, and yet there is so much to be clone. The 
frontiers opened by sc ience will afford greater opportunities for employment and 
increase in cultural advantages. Ever) generation lias serious problems. Our 
forefathers mastered theirs. Can we expect to do less? Certainly, when we look 
at the achievements ol this country during the last one hundred and fifty years, 
wi h our hopes and courage high, let us go— forward with jjurpose. 



20 



Coat lies: Mr. Hilton, Mr. Whittle 
Assistant Coach: Mr. Lyons 
Captain: Paul Roche 
Quarterback: J. Preston Barr) 
Left Halfback: Marguerite Starkey 
Right Halfback: Lenna Palmer 
Fullback: Ralph Hunter 



FIRST QUARTER 

The game had begun, and great excitement had enveloped the Weymouth 
High School gridiron as. on September 9, a group ol bewildered freshmen took 
their positions. 

The football team was expected to have a banner year under their new 
coach, Mr. Harry Arlanson. and Captain Charles Whife. 

The whistle blew. The ball soared down the held into the hands ol the 
Freshman-Senior Parly, which came up die field beautifully lor an advance' ol 
lit teen yards. Alter running oil a lew plunges at the center ol the line, the 
basketball quintet, under the leadership of Captain Paone, streaked around right- 
end lor the following yardage gain: thirteen victories; four defeats. 

A razzle dazzle in the form of an Amateur Show completed the march lot a 
first down. During a time-out, the teachers on the sidelines amused the team with 
"What Every Woman Knows." The Tatterman Marionettes followed suit and 
gave us "Jason and the Golden Fleece." 

Play was resumed, and with the advice of the Athletic Coun< il. a last moving 
play called the Athletic Dane c brought us over the fifty-yard line. A completed 
pass in the form of the Operetta. "Who Discovered America," carried us a few 
yards nearer the goal. The captain called for another time-out, and we watched 
the girls do a hue job in their Gym Exhibition. The baseball team aided measur- 
ably in the next play with their record ol nine wins against three defeats 
Meanwhile, some of the veteran players, (he se niors, had warmed up on the side- 
lines, and after being sent into the game, the) pulled an unexpected reverse 
called "Big Hearted Herbert" as their final play ol the scar. The freshmen, sure 
ol themselves by now. co-operated with the rest in a power play, just before the 
whistle blew for the end of the hi st cptarter. 

Referees: Gladys Dwyer, Gloria Poinsett 
Linesman: Antha Phillips 

SECOND QUARTER 

After the brief rest period between the quarters, during which our weary 
team regained its "pep" and prepared to go on anew, the whistle blew, and again 
the fame commenced. The ball was put into play by the Varsity Football team 
with Co-Captains Pine and DiLorenzo leading the attack. Their record of nine 
victo tes, no defeats, won them the Class B State Championship. 

At this point we employed a spinner play, the Glee Club taking the ball 
through a "Musical Revue" and then passing it to the Student Council, which 
completed the play to the tune of a Victory Dance 



22 



Captained by Bob Pirie, the basketball team fought through a sixteen-game 
schedule, to win twelve of the total. At this point, a group of fervid fans broke 
through the side-line ropes and started a lew maneuvers of their own. After all 
the excitement had subsided, we found that it was a group of pedagogic fans who 
were introducing a play that they called "Three Wise Fools." 

The whistle again blew, and the team gathered in a group around the water 
bo\: whereupon a well dressed gentleman came forward, and, capturing the 
attention of the entire crowd, began to tell about "Eskimo Land." Oh, how we 
wished that we were there! Football uniforms certainly are hot. 

After this gentleman had finished, another was introduced. He told us the 
story of liquid air. For a while our entire attention was centered here, but 
suddenly he departed, and we returned quickly to the spirit of the game! 

For a short time, our team lacked its usual team work and clever playing. 
Seeing this, our opponents put in a second team of midgets, who called themselves 
"The Tatterman Marionettes." These gentlemen proceeded to show us a new 
play an unexpected forward pass called "The "Faming of the Shrew." This 
roused our anger, for we did not believe that we were shrews, and we were not so 
easily tamed. Therefore, we started to work, and pulled a smart reverse play, in 
which the track team registered a South Shore Interscholastic Championship for 
Captain Austin. 

At this point in the quarter the cheering section had its attention taken from 
the game by a group of people who were shouting, in unison, something which 
must be important. From our positions on the field, we could not hear it all, 
but we did make out the words "Sun Up." It was the work of some of our older 
sc hoolmates. 

Captain John Stella ran on the field with the baseball team, which completed 
its season with six victories and five defeats. 

The second quarter came to a very silent and inactive close. The only dis- 
turbance was the hum of conversation in the grandstand. We marched tri- 
umphantly off the gridiron, glad to obtain a rest, but firmly resolve to go back in- 
to the game in the coming half with a renewed determination to fight and win! 

Referees: Ellen Coyle, Marie Garofalo 
■Linesman: Mary Rockwood 

THIRD QUARTER 

As the whistle blew for the kick-off at the beginning of the third quarter. 
Co-Captains Botterud and Lukis led their noble force into the game. They com- 
pleted a successful season with the very impressive record of six wins, two de- 
feats, and one tie. 

During a time-out the Weymouth Athletic Council furnished a banquet on 
December 9 in honor of the letter-man of the various sports. The senior letter- 
men of the football team received their sweaters at this time. 

The squad thundered into action again as play 17. the Junior Party, netted 
a substantial gain. The Athletic Council Dance on January 14, was responsible 
tor another advance toward the goal. Excellent passing and team work by the 
basketball team, under the able leadership of Captain Bill McCarthy, proved 
the basis for th#» coveted invitation to the Tech Tourney. 



23 



A snappy Teachers Play, "Craig's Wife," on February if), followed In the 
operetta. "Trial by Jury," and a Revue, on Max 20 and 21. accounted for a first 
down. 

A recovered fumble by Captain Lloyd Smith and his baseball players 
brought the ball deep into our toe's territory. The team finished die season with 
m\ wins and lour defeats. 

In a second time-out music was provided by the Glee Club and the Wey- 
mouth High School Band under Mr. Calderwood's direction. 

As the minutes ticked away, the seniors pulled a play called "Spring Dance" 
on June 17, which showed that training and experience are important. 

Just as the blast from the official's whistle ended the quarter, play 33, com- 
monly called the outing at Pro\ incetown. was responsible for leav ing many ol 
the players rather pale around the gills. Nothing so serious, however, that a rest 
period between quarters wouldn't heal. 

It was in this action-filled period that Paul Roche, Captain; Preston Barry, 
Quarterback; Ralph Hunter, Fullback; Marguerite Starkey, Left Hallback; 
Lenna Palmer. Right Hallback. received the whole-hearted support ol their fellow 
students. 

Referee: Robert Jorgensen. George Ronan 
Linesman: George Woolen 



FOUR! 11 QUARTER 

As the team entered the field for the last quarter, the younger enthusisasts, 
the freshmen, out en masse, to meet them. The result was the Freshman-Sen- 
ior Party. Shortly alter. Dr. Barker gathered the team and gave a heart-to-heart 
talk an "How to Make a Success ol Yourself." 

Then the whistle blew and the final quarter was on. 1 h rough the able 
direction of Captain foe Crehan, the masculine leaders ol the team led us through 
a successful football season with five wins, two defeats, and two ties. We were 
very fortunate this year to have a new football song and an Alma Mater Song, 
both composed by Mr. John Chiorse and Mr. Norman Loud. 

Once more on the offensive, the team opened up with an old play, but a very 
popular one, the Athletic Ball, which turned out to be a huge success. This gain 
was followed by a time-out during which the Chevrolet Motor Company present- 
ed moving pictures on "Safety." 

When the time-out was over, the next play was made b\ a member from 
each home room who put an end-around play, commonly known as the Sen- 
ior Christmas Pam . 

Next the basketball and wrestling teams took over the ball. The wrestling 
season was very successful and the team put on a grand play which made us swell 
with pride when the) won the Tufts Tournament. The basketball team, 
although not quite so successful, was one of which we might be proud. 

At this point the teachers took a hand in the game, pushing the ball forward 
foi another first clown with the plav known as "George and Margaret." The glee 
club also made excellent yardage with a new formation which they called "The 
Chimes of Normandy." With the ball deep in the enemy's territory, the coach, 



24 



Mr. Whittle, called another time out in older to permit the players to rest during 
a lecture on "The Old West.'' 

Then the jitter bugs ol the team seized the ball and threw it for a completed 
forward pass, the Senior Prom. Now another group, wanting publicity, put on 
a startling performance called "You Can't lake It With You." 

Nexl came the well earned victory for the members of the (lass ol 1939. 
\\ ith his graduation, each one had helped to make a touchdown possibe, and the 
ball was at last safely over, in the arms of the class marshal, Robert Jorgensen. 

A time out was called before the try lor the point, during which we were re- 
freshed by the banquet and reception. 

The line-up for the point alter— a trip to Province town— was quickly made 
and the point easily scored. This proved to be the most exciting part ol the entire 
game, for shortly afterward the whistle blew, ending all further united activity 
and sending each player on with the feeling victorious. 

Referees— Robert Gay, Robert Woodcock 
Linesman— Ingrid Monk 



1939 CLASS HISTORY 

WEYMOUTH VOCATIONAL SCHOOL 
Caach: Mr. Whipple 
Co plain: Leo 0*Hare 
Halfback: Russell Bean 
fullback: Walter Marsh 



FIRST HALF 

Receiving the opening kick-off, we broke into a snappy offensive, and on the 
first play, the Freshman-Senior party, marched four yards clown the field, tak- 
ing advantage of the surprise attack we had started. We broke into play seven, 
the printers* trip, and again we gained four yards. At this point, our offence 
bogged down and we were forced to kick. 

Alter holding our opponents to no gain in two tries, they kicked to us. and 
we started off again. After our first play had failed, a substitute came on the 
field and after the next play, informed us to try an end around play in the form 
of a trip to the Worcester Trade School, which was unusually successful, gaining 
nine yards and a first down. 

As our opponents' defence was smashed, we lined up quickly and threw a 
short pass over the line, which put us in an ideal spot to try our play 43, our first 
annual exhibition, which carried us all the way to the two yard line. 

At this point some of the juniors came in and lined up for a trip to Prov- 
incetown, but before they could get under way, the referee's whistle blew, an- 
nouncing the close of the first half. 

THIRD QUARTER 
Opening the second half, we started a scoring thrust with our exhibition 
at the Brockton Fair. We gained five yards in this particular play, and our hopes 



2 5 



Were running high, but wc were jolted out of our giddiness by a tumble on our 
next play— examination week. 

After regaining possession of the ball, we started out again, using play num- 
ber 43, the printer' trip, which, though not quite so successful as the last lime, 
was good enough to gain eleven yards. Trying desperately to get into our op- 
ponent's territory, our quarter-back called for a double reverse in the Eorm oi the 
addition of a sheet metal course. 

The play had been fast and tiring, and, as substitutions were made, we were 
sin prised to notice that during the game, two ne w Assistant Coaches, Mr. Malm 
and Mr. Clarke, had reported to Head Coach, Mr. Whipple. 

Our opponents now opened up their famed bag of tricks and being sorely 
pressed, our quarterback called time out. In the huddle, it was decided that the 
only way to stop the enemy's advance was to use the new defensive formation, 
the placement bureau, which had been taught to us In Assistant Coach, Mr. 
Duncan. 

On th next play our opponents fumbled and we recovered possession of the 

ball. 

Breaking into an unbalanced formation, we tried a long, down field pass, 
and carrying out our assignments perfectly in our second annual open house and 
exhibition, we completed ii 10 the fifty yard line. At this time the whistle blew, 
ending the third quarter. 

FOURTH QUARTER 

Alter the rest period between quarters, we saw that the third new assistant 
coach, Mr. Booth, who was also to coach our basketball team, had reported to 
Head Coach. Mr, Whipple, for duty. 

Falling back on our standard plays again, we used the Freshman-Senior 
Party to gain one yarn. 

Because our running attack wasn't gaining vcr\ much, we de c ided 10 resort 
to passes 10 produce a score. The lust pass was thrown In the Senior Class, it being 
1 he Senior Prom, which gained forty-five yards to our opponent's forty yard line. 

Calling time out to discuss our ollensive tactics, we learned that the prim 
shop had received a new Miehle Verticle press, and that the sheet metal shop 
had received a new acetylene welding outfit. During the time out, the water 
cart came on the field bearing a placard on each side, advising us all to see "You 
Can't Take It With You," presented by the Senior Class. 

The clock was slowly approaching the end of the game, and our quarterback 
decided to gamble everything on a last minute pass. The ball was snapped back 
to quarterback Leo O'Hare, who faded back and threw our graduation pass- 
play far down the field into the end zone, where our speedy right halfback, 
Russell Bean was waiting for it. 

Just as the ball settled into his arms, the timer's gun went off, ending the 
game. But we had scored the six pints to win the game, so that ii didn't worry 
us much when we failed to kick the extra point. 

Field fudge— Louis Wells 

Head Linesman— George Roberts 



g6 



One sunn) afternoon in Ma\ the Weymouth Eootball team was having spring 
practice at Legion Field. A toward pass! Our star player catches the ball 
and races down the field for a touchdown. Three yards from the line he is 
downed b) one oi his opponents. Seeing thai he made no attempi to move, the 
coaches rush onto the field with a first-aid kit. W ink the) are franticall) working 
over him he sees a strange vision— the ( lass of '39 ten years from now. 



HELEN A K I E . 

Helen is now the office stenographer in the 
Culver School for Boys. 

NATALIE ALLAN 

We sec- Nat sitting beside a hospital bed, 
smiling graciously as she soothes the aching 
head of a very good-looking patient. 

I 01 1SI WIOROSO 

Louise has given up her career as a busi- 
ness girl for marriage. 

f/HELMA ANDERSI N 

Thelma has now established herself firmly 
as private secretary to one of the higher ex- 
ecutives of a local concern. 

DORIS VNDERSON 

Dot is now taking up prospecting. She 
seems to be specializing in work on the "The 
Island." 

I 1)1 I II WDl R.SON 

Edie may be seen any warm spring morn- 
ing playing "Ring Around the Rosie" with 
her kindergarten class. 

Ill LI \ ANDERSON 

Helen is now manager and director of a 
large production. She is believed to have got 
hei stait at the Senior Christmas party com- 
mittee meetings. 

VERA ANDERSON 

Vera is very busy doing hair-dressing in The 
Modem Beaut) Shop. 

PAUL AUSTIN 

Paul owns a large prosperous goat [arm in 
central New Hampshire. 

LEWIS BACON 

Lewis was the chief designer of the latest 
government cruiser. 

RUSSELL BADGER 

Russ has gone into the Mower business. His 
chief ambition is to raise bigger and better 
Daisies. 

RITA BAILEY 

Rita is now wearing while. She has doctors 
and patients all aflutter. 

MARION BATES 

Marion is now pinch-hitting for Ina Ray 
Hutton, and what a hit she has made with 
the "swing fans!" 

SHIRLEY BARNES 

Shirley is now private secretary to the presi- 
dent of a geographic society which has recent- 
ly stalled to excavate near the Nile River in 
Egypt. 



PRESTON BARRY 

\ New York professional basketball quintet 
has I'us's signature on ihe dotted line. Re- 
member how he thrilled the Weymouth High 
spectators with his high scoring? 

ORMON BASSETT 

Eddn, when not pounding brass ;ii WILTk, 
is he.nl constructional engineer for one of the 
country's largest construction companies. 

Rl SSELL BEARD 

Russ, to his friends, is now the head man 
in the Lord 'Motor Company in New England. 

I LIZ VB1 I II BECKFORD 

Betty is leaching the students of Weymouth 
High how 10 sew a fine seam. 

(.1 R I RI DE BELL 

Dale Carnegie, whose school aims to develop 
personality, made a wise chiorc when he added 
Trudy to his staff. 

I HOMAS BELL 

Tom is now dividing his time between his 
c out 1 ,k 1 ing |ol) as (.iipenter and his newspaper 
business. He seems to be doing well at both. 

FREDERICK BICKNELL 

Fred is part owner of the leather factory. 
His father is the other partner. 

CORNELIA BOWIE 

Connie is now back at Weymouth High teach- 
ing dramatics. But archery is still her favor- 
ite pastime. 

kl NNI III BRADEEN 

Kenri} is now broadcasting over WHOH 
with his hill-billy band. Years of practice to- 
gethei while young boys accounts for their suc- 
cess. 

RAYMOND BI CHAN 

I see thai Ray is now leading his orchestra 
which is playing on a coast to coast network. 

WILLIAM BURNS 

Bill has just signed a contract to play base- 
ball for the New York Yankees. 

I RI D Bl 'SSI ERE 

"Ice, lady?"— Don't be alarmed, it's only 
mil own Fred Bussiere. He is now selling ice 
foi Greene Brothers. 

VI 1 Rl I) ( ADMAN 

Caddy, as all of his friends call him, is now 
the owner of the Drive-In Theatre in North 
Weymouth. He is doing a "whale" of a busi- 
ness. 



28 



JOSB PH CALLAHAN 

/<><• has finall'j achieved his ambition; he's 
chiel engineer at the South Weymouth Laun- 
dry. 

\\ II. LARD CANNON 

II ;// is now in I lie goat lmsiness. He has 
a large dairy in the country. 

ELENA C ARACCIOLO 

Elena has given up helping Miss Canning 
teach French, and is now a rising young star 
as a result of the experience she got in "You 
Can't lake It With You." 

PHYLLIS CARUSO 

Phyllis is the prettv, dark model whom you 
see in the current magazines. 

THERESA CASSESE 

Theresa is very busy as hostess in one of 
Boston's largest hotels. 

ROSE MARIE CHRISTIE 

Marie now has her own basketball team. 
I be\ pla\ all the large teams and always come 
out on top. 

\ I NCI N 1 CIRIGLIANO 

I' nice is to wrestle Danno O'Mahoney for 
i be World's Championship. 

DOROTHY CLARE 

Do/ is working on a local paper. She's giv- 
ing Walter Winchell and Jimmy Fidlcr some 
competition. 

VIRGINIA COBB 

Virginia has her own little tearoom in a 
small college town, and is a great favorite 
among the students. 

U.M.S COOPER 

Agnes is now being featured with Robert 
Gay's orchestra as pianist. The more she plays, 
the more the audience wants. 

DORIS CORNELL 

Do/ has at last reached her goal. She is an 
administrator for the Townsend National Re- 
covery Plan. 

[OHN COUGHLIN 

Jack has joined the Foreign Legion, to "get 
away from it all." 

JEANNETTE (OWE I I 

Jan is now a nurse taking care of the poor 
unfortunates who happen to end up in the 
hospital. 

RUTH COWLES 

Vftei sewing on the (Coed Klub of Idlewell 
for ten years, Ruth has finally become secretary. 

1 I I I N COYLE 

Ellen is spelling her way to fame. She has 
just finished learning all the words in an un- 
abridged dictionary. She has yet to meet her 
equal. 

FRANCES CRANE 

Frances is a social worker. She always was 
a girl who mixed easily. 



ROBERT CRAWFORD 

Duddie is a cowboy Casanova in the movies. 

JOSEPH CREHAN 

}<><■ is now an all-American back at Notre 
Dame. 

ALBERT CROSSMAN 

Mike is now manager of the largest group 
of chain stores in this section. "Afternoons 
ami Saturdays" gave him his stait. 

CATHERINE DACEY 

We always knew - Kit's chemistry in W. H. S. 
would come in handy. She has just completed 
a formula to prevent Russ-ty hinges from 
squeaking. 

BLANCHE DAVIDSON 

Blanche is teaching at the Weymouth High 
School. She graduated from Bridgewater Teach- 
ers' College. 

RUTH DAMS 

Ruth is a stenographer for the J. M. Good 
Company. She and the boss get along so well 
that next week she'll become owner. 

VIRGINIA M. DeLORIA 

Virginia is head of the Boston Dramatic 
School, and it is whispered about that she turns 
out mam hue actresses. 

HOW ARD DEMPSEY 

Howard is now - running the Dempsey Drug 
Store. He obtained much of his experience at 
a local pharmacy. 

WILFRED DeYOUNG 

Will is a bus driver lor the Greyhound Com- 
pany. He gained the experience by driving 
a wing around in his father's car. 

HELEN DONOVAN 

Helen is a beauty consultant, and special- 
izes on cosmetics. She is ranked high in her 
held. 

MARGARET DRISCOLL 

Grete is head nurse in a large hospital, and 
they say that the doctors all have heart trouble. 
Could it be the work? 

DONALD DUDLEY 

Don is now editor for a well-known news 
paper. He got his start in a small way deliver- 
ing Sunday papers at Nash's Corner. 

JOSEPH DUNCAN 

loc now holds the spotlight in the prize ring 
through his sensational knockouts as " I lie 
Shamrock Crusher." He holds the state middle- 
weight title. 

JANET DURGIN 

Jan has now remodeled deat old W. H. S. 
You wouldn't know the place! 

MAR JORIE DURGIN 

Margie has taken up singing. She still pre- 
fers "Carroll" singing to an) other kind of vo- 
calizing, however. 

GLADYS DWYER 

Gladie is now a nurse in a New Hampshire 
hospital. Hei spc(iall\ is Ward One. 



29 



I EDWARD DWYER 

Milky is now working 1 1 is way up through 
l he milk business. 

GEORGE EACOBACC1 

George and his accordion are heard regu- 
larl) on station W'.H.S. 

EDWARD EATON 

Ed is head of ihe Drafting Department at 
the Fore Rivei Ship Yard. 

HELEN EVANS . 

Helen is now secretary in the Governor's 
office, and enjoys her work very much. 

VI VDELON EVIRS 

Madelon is assistant to Dr. Smith, the den- 
tist, who has .1 large office in Boston. They 
say man) people are having trouble with their 
Leeth these days, 01 could there be some at- 
tention in the office? 

CHARLES FARRAR 

Charles played so much hockey when he 
was sm.ill thai the Bruins signed him up as 
first-string center. 

BRUCE FOX 

Bruce now holds a well earned position in 
military engineering at the War Department 
in Washington. 

CAROLYN FURBISH 

Carohn has met with rather sudden and lin- 
es pet ted success as a designer of ladies' 

dresses. 

GORDON P. GARDINER 

Gordon is now living on a South Sea Island 
surrounded by beautiful women. What a life! 

I'HYJ LIS L. GAROFALO 

/'//// sits behind a big mahogany desk and 
dictates to a poor stenographer. She enjoys 
watching someone else suffer. 

MARIE E. GAROFALO 

Marie is as calm and serene as ever and many 
a pooi sufferei looks forward to the visits of 
this sweet and gentle nurse. 

PHILLIP GATELY 

Phil is now featured as the "masked marvel" 
on the posters lining the Quincy Arena. 

M \l<\ GAUGHEN 

Man is still in high school. However, she is 
on the faculty as a "stenog" teacher. 

ROBERT GAY 

Hah and his swing band arc heard on WEEI. 
His love Eoi music while in high school lined 
him to the top. 

CHARLES GOODALE 

Hud is now captain of the Davis Cup team, 
and has won all the international titles in 
tennis. 

GILBI R I GOODWIN 

Goody can now be seen at the Plymouth 
t heatre in the prize play of the year. 



EVELYN GORMAN 

Evelyn is now one of the idle rich. She ob- 
tained her money by inventing an automatic 
bed-maker, which does not disturb the occu- 
pant. 

[RENE B. GORMAN 

Irene is still enjoying life as much as ever. 
Her motto is "Laugh and the world laughs 
with you." 

EDI I II GR VCE 

Edith is the noted "Women about Town." 
for the Boston Post. 

LUCILLE GREENE 

/.;/ has opened up a chain of roller skating 
rinks throughout the country. 

01 Wl HAKALA 

The "Virginia," drafted l>\ Hakala, was chris- 
tened at Fore River Ship Yard. It is the fastest 
destroyer of the world, being ecpiipped with 
the latest Diesel engines. 

ERNEST HANI AN 

Ernest is now following in his father's foot- 
steps ;is manager of the South Shore Sand and 
Gravel Company. 

MARY HANIAN 

Mary is a crack reportei on the Boston 
(.lobe. They say she's always there when some- 
thing happens. 

CHRIS I INI HARKINSON 

Christine has lately acquired the enviable 
position as secretary to a famous lawyer. 

CHARLES W. HEGAR I Y 

/Ac has taken Gene Krupa's place on the 
radio. Before his fame, he could be heard on 
station W.H.S. 

\(.\l s HENDRK kM>\ 

Henny is now working for the Beech Nut 
Chewing Gum Factory, demonstrating how to 
chew gum gracefully. 

|OHN I. HERLIHY 

Chei has entered in the- automobile rates 
and comes out first in them all. 

WILLIAM HILL 

Hud followed his brother, Herb, to Hyannis, 
and now he's a first-class teachei in good old 
Weymouth High. 

GRACE E. HOLBROOK 

Grade is now secretary to a certain orchestra 
leader. I wonder who he is? 

GORDON HOLDER 

Gordon has become the sponsor of a chorus 
of a thousand gills appearing in "foolish 
lollies." 

ELMER HOLLLS 

Elmer has made a fortume in the fur busi- 
ness, trapping skunks. 

MARGARET V. HOLMES 

Peggy, who has always had towering ambi- 
tion, is now a promising young aviatrix. She 
obtained all her living knowledge with the 
swallows back at old W.H.S. 



3° 



I AMI'S HOUGHTON 

Jim has become a banker. Every clay he 
w;iu lies the Red So\. 

EDWIN G. HOUSTON, JR. 

/.'(/ is a radio engineer for WEEI located 
m the M\stic Valley. If you hear any Q.R.M., 
blame it on Ed. 

MARGARET J. HOWE 

Margaret is now a petite waitress in the 
Hotel Statler. 

MARGUERITE D. HOWSBERGER 

Contai\ to her expectations. Miggles is now 
a school teacher in the elementary grades. Be- 
tween classes, however, she devotes her time 
to perfecting that inevitable giggle. 

BARBARA W . HI NT 

Barb runs a beautv parlor in New York on 
Fifth Avenue where all the "debs" go. 

GEORGE F. HUNTER 

George has outfitted and led several hunt- 
ing expeditions into Africa. Fie has presented 
Weymouth High with stuffed animal heads 
[oj each home room. 

RALPH HUNTER, JR. 

Ralph is the president of a prominent coni- 
pan\ in Boston. Incidentlv girls, his office is 
located on Beacon Street, and we understand 
he prefers blondes. 

ALICE HYNES 

Mice is still attending W. H. S. daily. She 
is our dietician in the cafeteria. Ah! What 
■41 and meals! 

B \RBARA ILIFFE 

Barbara is now the head of a personal es- 
cort bureau. At last, she has all the fellows 
she wants. 

WARREN F. JANELLE 

Bud went to General Electric's school of weld- 
ing after his graduation from W - . H. S. He did 
very, well, and is now general manager of the 
plant. 

DAVID JOHNSON 

Dave is Hying tor Bayside. He takes you for 
a ride for a dollar. 

ELEANOR JOHNSON 

Our charming Eleanor is now a model in a 
well-known Paris gown shop 

ETHEL JOHNSON 

Ethel is a self possessed housewife, one of 
[he few of our class mates who has abandoned 
1 he life of single blessedness. 

I'M I. F. JOHNSON 

Paul is showing America what the well- 
dressed man is wearing. He's a salesman in a 
Boston men's store. 

AI DA H. JONES 

We find Alda busily attending to affairs in 
the While house. 

I'd VI- REV JONES 

Beverl) is connected with the Smith Brothers' 
cough drop firm. 



ROBFRT JORGENSOX 

/orgy is consulting engineer in a well-known 
electrical company in New York, thanks to 
thai lour years at M. I. T. 

MARGARET A. JOYCE 

Margaret is now teaching a kindergarten 
and her sunny smile and cheerful disposition 
have niei with great favor among the children. 

MARY E. JOYCE 

Mary now owns a prosperous farm. She speci- 
alizes in raising ducks and "Drakes." 
MARY KARAIAN 

Mar) is conducting a thriving baker) busi- 
ness. 

NELLIE KARl'INSKAS 

Nellie has finally become a famous concert 
pianist. She returns once a yeai to Weymouth 

10 give the students pointers 011 playing the 
piano. 

FRED W . KARSTUNEN 

Freddie has just succeeded F. D. R. as head 
scoutmaster of the Boy Scouts of America. 

RITA M. KEARNS 

As yet, Rita has not been able to tear her- 
self away from W '. H. S. She is now there as 
a member of the faculty. Such a pleasing dis- 

11 act ion for this modern generation of students. 

ELIZABETH G. KELLY 

Elizabeth has become the head of a biolog- 
ical labratory. She always was the studious 
type. 

GAROLD KELSO 

Kelso has recently bought the great-grand- 
son of Sea Biscuit. He now owns several of the 
count rv's outstanding horses. 

ANNA KENDRICK 

Anna is now a clerk in the Railway Express 
Office. She spends most of her time watching 
"Damns Express" go by. 

DOROTHY L. KEXISTOX 

Pullman lines are doing no business be- 
cause of their new hostess, our own Dollic. 

MARION KNOX 

Marion still spends her spare hours teaching 
Weymouth and Braintree dancers the Iatesl 
steps. 

MARY M. LAMBE 

Mar) has taken charge of the main ollice, 
and has helped it maintain its efficiency. 

CHARLES LEAHY 

Charlie is now a messenger for a Boston firm. 
Delivering notes was always his specialty. 

S I VNLEY LEARY 

Slan has at least become "Scituated" as the 
singing iceman and can be seen any time in 
hi.s N ice N ice truck. 



31 



ROSE LIPSKY 

Rose is secretary to a well-known theatrical 
producer in Holhwood. She is not only the 
perfect secretary, Inn we know she will soon 
appear in the picture Love Flics High. 

K \ I HR^ N LOBI RG 

Kn\ is a nurse working from 2-5 Saturday 
afternoon at the Weymouth Town Hall, with 
the baby clinic. 

|OSEPH LOCKARY 

lor moved to Canada after graduation. He 
is now a professional hockey player on a Can- 
adian team. 

I'l I I R Id CHAN 

Pete was one of the class artists. He is now 
working on a Boston newspaper, putting out 
some witty, well-drawn cartoons. 

\ I l( I LONG 

.// has at last become famous for her book. 
"How to Act at Parties." 

|OHN LONG 

John is the local iceman of North Weymouth. 

LOl IS LYSAKOW SKI 

Louie has the honor of being the \oungest 
captain ever to have charge of an ocean liner. 

MARGARET MacDONNELL 

/ijtiv still likes school. She is private secretary 
to a professor at M. I. T. 

Ml Kll 1 MacDON \I D 

Muriel has recently sailed for Hollywood 
alter a successful screen lest. Will someone 
kindly warn Joan Bennett? 

MYR1 LE MacDt )\ \l 1) 
Myrtle is one of those much-sought-after 

stenographers, because she knows how to do 
something besides chew gum and play with 
her hair. 

WAL1 ER Mac I 1 OI) 

Walter has improved the water svstems of 
the modern home with his new pipe alloy. 

EDWARD MADDEN 

Ed follows that honored profession of teach- 
ing, in order to keep his cupboard well stocked 
with groceries. 

( Fl \RI 1 s M VRPLE 

Charlie went to college and became a lawyer. 
His specialty is getting peopie out of jail. 

MARIE MARTIN 

Marie has finally reached her goal. She is 
now the first women President of the United 

Slates. 

ROGER MacALEER 

Roger has reached the height of success in 
Hollvwood after getting a good start in the 
Senior Plav. "You Can't Take it With You." 

EVELYN Mc ANDREWS 

Red is now surrounded by money. She is 
working in the "Nichols" department of the 
mint. 



JUSTN McC \R I HV 

Jud is employed by a large steamship line 
as head steward on one of their floating palaces. 

(.1 \l)\s McCULLOCH 

Gladys runs a boarding-house the occupants 
ol which are mosth wrestlers. Incidentally she 
has no trouble keeping them under control. 

HELEN McGRORY 

Helen is now a meml>er of the \.' H. S. fac- 
ulty. I hear she sells the apples her pupils 
I. ring her on the side and has reaped (|ii>le a 
profit. 

[AMI S Mc I \RI \\1) 

Jimmy is now forest ranger. He is stationed 
at Grand Canyon National Park. 

[OS! PH Mc kl \/II 

foe is the leader of a hand which tia\cls 
around the country playing swing. 

PAU1 McNULTY 

Mac, who always was a pretty good wrestler, 
earns his bread and butter b\ following that 
ancient system of legalized mayhem as a pro- 
fession. 

WA1 I I R Mc ol FADE 

Jimmy is now gym instructor at W. H. S. 
showing the boys how it really ought to be 
done. 

N YTHALIE MEANS 

Nathalie recently appeared on a Major 
Bowe's program, and was rewarded with a 
steady job singing with one of Major's units. 

|()H\ MEHRM \N 

Johnnie has entered the business world. He 
is now the manager of Ruppert Ale Company. 

M \m MELVILL1 

In the snappy society column of a well- 
known paper we mav read between the lines 
the name of its very successful reporter. Mary 
Melville. 

SADIE MESSIRl W 

Sadie has followed her favorite hobby, and 
has become one of the foremost singers in the 
choir of her church. 

M IRION Ml I ( M I 

Marion has realized her ambition to become 
a nurse and is now working in the Massachu- 
setts General Hospital. 

IM.RII) MONK 

Inarid is head of the Math Department at 
I.aSalle Extension University. 

DOROTHY MOORE 

Dot is now a dashing reporter cl ' 
to "hustle" by always running to c. 

ROBFRT MORSE 

Bob is the fellow who sits behind a large 
desk marked President and makes the poor 
salesmen quake if thev happen to get that far. 

lOSEPH MURPHY 

lor is now the leading artist for a book com- 
pany. His specialty is a perfect blond girl. 



32 



ALICE MURRAY 

Alice is a dance hall hostess. She has bought 
Morev Pearl's place, and gives dances every 
Friday night for her classmates of 1939. 

CHARLES MUSTER 

Charlie has become a farmer: so be careful 
of what you eat. 

FRANK. NESS 

Frank has perfected the Diesel Engine for 
cars which saves him work at the gas pump. 

HOWARD NICHOLS 

Nick has just won the cup at the National 
Ice-Boat races. 

I AMES NOLAN 

Jimmie is now a golf pro in Florida and has 
attained the world's greatest record— 15 putts 
for 18 holes. 

EMILY NORkl'S 

Emilv is one of the few female truant officers 
in the United States. Boy! is she efficient? 

THOMAS O'HARA 

Tom has taken Paul Wing's place as the spell- 
ing master on the N. B. C. spelling bee. 

MYRTLE OLSON 

Myrtle is employed as a masseuse in an es- 
tablishment for turning your limbs to rubber 
and your back to a mass of bruises. 

ANN O'NEIL 

Peggy has achieved her ambition as dieti- 
tian. She is now counting not only her own 
calories but others. 

KATHERINE ORCUTT 

Kay is now the proprietor of a fruit store. 
Apples are her specialty. Three guesses who 
is her best customer. 

LOUISE OUELLET 

Louise now has her own beauty shop at Wey- 
mouth Landing. She has found a way to grow 
hair on hairless dogs. 

RITA OUELLET 

Rita is now the American Tennis Cham- 
pion: Legion Field Tennis courts are where she 
practiced. 

'OSEPH PACKARD 

]'>e has taken the advice of a former Wey- 
mouth school teacher by quitting his job as 
.1 grocery boy and is now a famous gigolo in 
a Boston night club. 

" * I MER 

^hes French at W. H. S. Her pupils 
slionlc ,t outstanding as a result of her in 
1 c 1 1 s i \ c drill of pronunciation. 

GEORGE PARDO 

George has taken over a large shoe concern 
in Boston, and now has a first class shoe manu- 
facturing company. Pardo Shoes. Inc. 

I/OROTHY PARKER 

Dot is now running a home for orphans. 
You can see her any day "bobbing'' along 
with her twelve children. 



CONCETTA PASSERO 

Connie teaches chemistry and physics. Does 
she know her subjects! 

LAURA PASSERO 

Laura has achieved her ambition to become 
a private secretary, due to the training she 
teceived at W. H. S. 

RE NEE PATENAUDE 

Renee is a model, modeling clothes for Jor- 
dan Marsh Company. 

FRANK PECORARO 

Frank has finally become the world's feather 
weight boxing champion. He knocked out the 
title holder recently. 

ROSE PF.RRONF. 

Rosie works in R. H. White's modeling doll 
clothes. 

ANDREW PETERS 

At last Andy is getting enough sleep. He is 
now playing the part of Rip Van Winkle on the 
stage. 

ANTHA PHILLIPS 

Antha still can pick the winners. She now 
owns a profitable stable of her own. 

THERESA PICCUITO 

Trie is now conducting classes on "Correct 
Delivery of Oral Compositions." 

ELIZABETH PIKE 

Bcttx is busily engaged as a dental nurse. 
She finds it very easy to keep the patients' 
mouths open by her ever-ready jokes and hu- 
morous sayings. 

SHIRLEY PINGREE 

Shirley still likes to fly high. She now has 
her own plane and is planning a transcon- 
tinental "hop." 

YVETTE PLOURDE 

Y\ette is now running her own gas station on 
Pleasant St. She was an assistant during her 
W. H. S. days. 

GLORIA POINSETT 

Gloria is the private secretary to the presi- 
dent of a large firm. She attributes her success 
to the good marks she received in high school. 

[OSEPH POIRIER 

foe became a furniture salesman. He had a 
good eve for business and got ahead fast. He 
row has his own store. 

I RWIN PRAY 

Erwin played heavily in the stock market, 
and by a stroke of genius, turned out a mil- 
lionaire. 

MILDRED ROBINSON 

Millie is happily married to her ideal man. 

PAUL ROCHE 

Paul graduated from West Point years ago, 

and is now a commissioned officer of Unc'e 
Sam's army. 



33 



M \RY ROCKWOOD 

Mary has just stalled .1 class of sub-del>s— 
teaching tliem liow to keep fit. 

GEORGE RONAN 

George now owns a large newspaper concern. 
His earl) experience in business helped him 
gain success. 

fOSI PH ROSS 

His ruggedness and toughness caused the 
Boston Bruins to sign Joe as a defense man 
and for "bumping off" the opposition. 

PRISCI] LA ROUNDS 

Cilia is an efficient private secretary. She runs 
the office, the boss, and anything else that needs 
managing. 

BERNARD Rl'GGI.F.S 

W innie is now a great scholar in Oxford 
University. He is the head of the French De- 
partment. His pupils call him "Vcsi-cc pas" 
Ruggles. 

LUCY RUSSO 

Luc) has hei own beauty parlor, now. 
Bo\! what she can do to straight hair! 

DOKOI H\ SAUNDERS 

Dot now has everyone's number. She is an 
experienced telephone operator. 

MARY SAVAGE 

Mai\ is now on a cruise around the world 
fulfilling a dicam she dreamed during her 
high school clays at W. H. S. 

BARBARA SAVA RY 

Barbara has gone in for royalty. She has 
recently joined a family ot Earls. 

CLARENCE SCIOSCIA 

Aftei learning the art from his father, Clar- 
ence has become Weymouth's leading tailor. 

COR \ SEWALL 

Cora is now happil) mat tied and has a 
food chemistry department of her own. 

[EANNE SUA I I OKI) 

Jeanne is a hairdresser, now, teaching the 
younger set how to keep their hair blonde. 

I i 1 VNOR SHI PPARD 

Eleanor is now starring in a Paramount 
production "Giggles." 

DAVID SJOSTEDT 

Dave has turned to professional wrestling. 
He is now traveling incognito undei the name 

of The Jitterbug. 

DOROTHY SLOCUMB 

Daitx has opened a dentist's office in Brock- 
ton. Competition was too keen in Weymouth. 

MARGARET SPILLANE 

Margie is a telegraph messenger. She always 
was a good messenger carrier for 304. 

WILLIAM SPILLANE 

Bill has become a successful travelling sales- 
man. 



EVERE1 1 s IAPLES 

F.verett has gone to Florida after a success- 
ful season playing the horses. 

M VRG1 ER1 I 1 S rARKEY 

Peg is now a member of a walking club. She 
enjoys walking the (little) miles. 

GRACE STEVENS 

Gracie is working on a farm teaching the 
tows how to truck. 

DORO I III \ s rONELY 

Dot is now teaching in high school. She is 
teaching economics to a former economic 
teacher's children. 

MARJORII SWAYNE 

Marjorie has made a successful career as a 
librarian in the Boston Public Library. 

RALPH SWEENEY 

Ralph has become a successful newspaper 
man. He also plays a good game of tennis. 

GORDON TJEAGUE 

Gordon is now in Hollywood directing his 
Acaeleim Players. He takes the part of Robert 
(.able in all of his productions. 

(.FORGE THOMAS 

George has clone well for himself since his 
high school \eats. He has worked his way up 
from .1 bell hop to general manager in a prom- 
inent hotel in Boston. 

ROIU R I I HRI I 1 Al l. 

Magnetism is no longer a theory. Our Hob 
has discovered the law in his own research lab. 

I D\ \ I IGHE 

Teddy is now running a kindergarten. She 
is busy teaching the children how to skip 
school. 

Kl III I [RRELL 

Untitle is now a slat reporter for the Boston 
American. Her pride is the comic section. 

[EAN I OMPRINS 

(can likeel W. H. S. so well that she has 
come back 10 teach Latin and Algebra. 

VNNE LOOM I A 

Anne is the editor-in-chief of the Alpha at 
Bridgewater. She received her knowledge of 
editing as editor of the Weymouth High 
Reflector. 

VIRGINIA TRAVERSE 

Virginia has opened a pet shop on Boslston 
Street. We hear she has some beautiful Paul- 
parrots. 

RUTH rRENEAR 

Ruth has fulfilled her one ambition. She is 
a comic-strip writer, and laughs all clay long. 

BELMONT TRCDF.LL 

Belmont held a winning ticket in the last 
Irish Sweepstakes, and is now taking a round- 
the-world cruise. 

FLORICE TUTTLE 

Florice has turned her talents for business. 
She has now established herself as a partnei 
in a stationery stoic. 



31 



DOROTHY VANASSE 

Dot is .1 professional gvm teacher. She is 
teaching her pupils the art of walking cor- 
rectly. 

WW VARTANIAN 

Anna is now a great singer. She got her train- 
ing during study periods in room 304. 

EILEEN VICINJ 

We hear that Eileen has been engaged by 
the Metropolitan Opera Company. She must 
ha\c received her training in the W. H. S. glee 
clubs. 

JUNE VICKERY 

|une still spends her evenings roller skating; 
but she owns her own rink. 

MARGUERITE VILLANOV \ 

We hear that Margy is the new dietitian in 
Woolworth's 5 & 10. She cats all the hot dogs 
herself. 

DOROTHY W ADM AN 

Dot has finalh found the Ions; lost fame she 
has been waiting for. She is in the chorus of 
the Metropolitan Opera Company. 

BERNICE WARMBOLD 

Bernie now designs dresses for the glamorous 
Hollywood stars. 

GEORGE WARREN 

George is slowly retracing the steps of Ein- 
stein in his youthful \eais. 

DOBSON WEBSTER 

Dick, as some know him, and Dobbin as 
others do. graduated from college at the head 
of his class. He is now retired from work and 
living on his estate in Beverly Hills. He owns 
the Coca Cola Company. 

RUTH WHEELER 

Ruth is a private secretary in a large law 

firm in Boston. Let's give her a clap for her 

success. 



FR WCI S WHITCOMB 

Franhy— after concentrated study— has pub- 
lished a book Football in Ten Easy Lessons. 

ROBERT WILKIE 

Hob is working in a hardware store. He 
spends most of the time wishing that the idles 
there were his. or thinking about a North 
Weymouth resident. 

1 1 1 WORK E . W 1LLIAMSO N 

Eleanore is now a private secretary in a rain 
coat concern in the Sahara Desert. 

WILLIAM WILLINDER 

Bill has at last reached his goal— he's a cook 
in the National Guard. 

BARBARA WING 

llarb has become a great movie star in the 
technicolor films. (Blondes take to color.) 

ROBERT WOODCOCK 

The government has accepted Woody's new 
i\ completed pursuit plane which passed the 
test with little difficult. 

GEORGE WOOTEN 

George is busy watching the Red Sox in their 
pennant fight and keeping the Sons of the 
Legion booming. Oh. ves! in his spare time 
he works for the government. 

CHARLES WORKMAN 

Charlie has just purchased a large farm. He 
intends to make flowers his specialty, even 
though he is definitely opposed to the Bees. 

[OS! PHINE YORK 

/or is now chief dietitian in a large restau- 
rant. She received her experience in the W.H.S. 
rafeteria. 

MILDRED ZEOLIE 

Mildred has received merit as an amateur 
author. She has had one of her stories pub 
lished in a local magazine. 



PROPHECY COMMI TTEE 



MARY JOYCE, Chairman 
THELMA ANDERSEN 
RUSSELL BADGER 
THOMAS BELL 
JOSEPH CALLAHAN 
GEORGE EACOBACC1 
CHARLES GOODALE 
[RENE GORMAN 
EDITH GRACE 
DAVID JOHNSON 
RITA K EARNS 
MARY LAMBE 
WALTER MacLEOD 
MARY MELVILLE 



I MOM YS O H YR1 
KATHERINE ORCUT1 
CONCETTA PASSERO 
LAURA PASSERO 
[OSEPH ROSS 
BARBARA SAVARY 
RUTH TIRRELL 
GEORGE THOMAS 
[EAN TOMPKINS 
DOBSON WEBSTER 
JOSEPH DURANT, T. S. 
HAROLD KOSONEN, T. S. 
FRANCIS PECORARO, T. S. 
PAUL STELLA, T. S. 



35 



Vocational School Prophecy 



|()H\ BEAN 

John is still in the chicken business. He owns 
one of the largest farms in the East. 

LOUIS BELCASTRO 

Louie worked in a foundry for awhile to 
get toughened up. Now he is wrestling at the 
new and larger* Quincy Arena. 

ROB! R I BURNS 

Burnsie has gone in for livestock in a big 
way. He is the head of a big piggery in South 
\\ ey mouth. 

W il l is BURNS 

Hums has reached the height of success. He is 
employed in New York as a carpenter on one 
ol the new skw lapeiv 

JOHN COLLINS 

Johnny, one of our first-class printers, now 
works at that big printing firm. Pern Press, 
in Quincy. 

MICHAEL COREY 

Mike now owns and personally runs a taxi 
hue between South Weymouth and W. H. S. 
every morning. 

WILLIAM DALE 

/{/// has opened a garage on Charles Street. 
He fixes the shoe workers' i.us while the} .ne- 
at work. 

|()M PH 1)1 RAN I 

Joe after years ol haul work, has finallv 
discovered the formula for loafing. 

WILLI Wl (. M I AN I" 

Bill has gone into I lie pastry business. He- 
has just sent in for a large order of "Cookies." 

LOUIS GRANT 

Louie, an ambitious worker, is now trying 
to sell ice boxes to the Eskimos. 
GEORGE INGLIS 

George, after trying for several years, has 
finally published a book. On the Ozarks. 

CLARENCE JERMTi N 

Clarence is the sole owner of a large transport 
plane. 



HAROLD KOSONEN 

Harold, being a woman's man, now owns 
and privately operates an escort bureau. His 
office is located in East Weymouth. 

\\ \l I I R \l \KSII 

Walter is the leading actor of America. He 
gained his earl) experience in the Senioi Play. 

LEO O HARE 

Lee is now President of the United States 
He acquired his experience from the W. Y. S. 

FR VNCIS PECORARO 

I- rant is is spending his lime Irving to invent 
.1 device to stop him Irom eating his lunch be- 
fore lunch lime. 

(.1 ORGJ ROBERTS 

George is now a great sports writer. He works 
loi the Braintrcc Ga/cltc, covering Junior 
League baseball games. 

I \\\ Ri \( I SMI I II 

Lawrence has taken up "spooking". He 
haunts a certain street in South Weymouth 
every night. 

ZANO SPADA 

/ano is in the Big League. He manages the 
Weymouth Braves. 

r\l L STI I E \ 

Paulie is working on an experiment. It is a 
magnel which he plates in (he pins in a bow- 
ling alley to attract the ball. This gives him the 
advantage at all limes. 

WARREN rRIBOU 

Warren builds ships for Fore River Ship 
Yard in his spare lime. 

LOUIS WELLS 

Louie has consolidated the G. C. Hamburg 
Stands. He formed a partnership with his for- 
mei employer. 



36 



Irs the Future -on Fore i Gn Shores 




37 




6- 



HELEN G. AKIE 

Weymouth Landing Business Coarse 

Who's Who Committee 4: Glee Club t; Gym 
F.xhibition 2: Gregg Shorthand Theory Certif- 
icate \: too Words a Minute Gregg Transcrip- 
tion Certificate 4; Trade School Office 4. 

/ -.reel and kind disposition has she. 



NATALIE M. ALLAN 

"Nat" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 

Usher at Senior Class Play 4: Glee Club {; 
Operetta \. 

There's a merry /winkle in her eye. 



LOUISE A. AMOROSO 

"Lou" i 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Usher at Operetta 4: Stenography Club 4: Gregg 
Shorthand Theory Certificate 4; 100 Words a 
Minute Gregg Transcription Certificate 4. 
She is known for tier chuckle and inexhaustible 
patter of talk. 

THELMA E. ANDERSEN 

"Thel" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Class Propheq Committee \; Student Council 
y, (.lee Club 1; Home Room Treasurer 3; Home 
Room Traveler Spelling Medal 3; Gregg Short- 
hand Theory Certificate 4; 100 Words a Minute 
Gregg Transcription Certificate 4; Honor Roll 
2. Secretary to Mr. Nelson 4. 

There was a lass and she was fair. 



DORIS M. ANDERSON 

"Dot" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Ushei at Operetta 4: Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate \: 100 Words a Minute Gregg Trans- 
script ion Certificate 4. 

Small in form, mighty in friends. 



EDITH A. ANDERSON 

"Edie" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 

Junior from Committee 3; Senior Reception 
Decorating Committee 3; Graduation Reception 
Committee 4; Basketball 1, Student Council 3. 
./ girl of capable efficiency and a charming 
manner. 



HELEN M ANDERSON 

"Red" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Christmas Part) Committee 4; Gregg Short- 
hand Theor) Certificate 4: too Words a Minute 
Transcription Certificate {. 
A generous and genial nature— and red gold 
hair. 

VERA ANDERSON 

"Jackie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Usher at Senior Class Play 1; Basketball 1. 2, 3, 
|: Volley Ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 2; Gym 
Demons! rat ion 1. 2, 3, 4. 

As prone to mischief, as able to perform it. 

PAUL H. AUSTIN 

"Chick" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

Class Banquet Committee 4. 

We give you welcome. 

LEWIS H. BACON, III 

"Louie" "Lew" 

Weymouth Landing Technical Course 

Who's Who Committtee 4; Radio Club 3, 4; 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2. 

There is a lightness and a friendliness to his 
greeting that we like. 

RUSSELL W. J. BADGER, Jr. 

"Russ" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Class Nominating Committee \; Class Prophecy 
Committtee 4; Football 3, 4; Gym Exhibition 
2; Intramural Basketball 2: Book Room Duty 
\: Student Council Assistant 4; 

Honesty is the best policy. 

RITA BAILEY 

"Rit" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 

There is a modesty about hei that makes one 
wish to know her better. 

SHIRLEY E. BARNES 

"Smiley" 

South Weymouth General Course 
Senior Reception Committee 4; Glee Club 1. 2. 
Gracious indeed is her way with us all. 



41 




42 



J. PRESTON BARRY 

"Zeke" "Press" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 

Basketball 2, 3. 4: Football 3. 4: Baseball 4: 
Vice-President of Class 3. 4. 

"Why take life so seriously/" 



THOMAS E. BELL 



" Tom " 
South Weymouth 



' Tommy" 

Business Course 
ass Prophec) Committee |. 



Brisk, business-like, dependablt 



ORMON E. BASSE T T 

"Eddie" 

North Weymouth Technical Course 

Chess Club 2. 3: Radio Club 2. 3. 4: Camera 
Club 3; Joint Winner of Aviation Contest 4. 
His interests are through the ail and over the 
air. 



MARION BATES 

We\ mouth Landing Classical Course 

Class Banquet Committee 4; 212 Class Dues 
Collector 4. 

// is nice to be quiet and smart. 



FREDERICK A. BICKNELL 

"Fred" 

Easi Weymouth Technical Course 
Clothing Committee 4. 

He'll find a way 



CORNELIA S. BOWIE 

"Connie" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 
Usher at Operetta 3; French Club 3: Candy 
GirJ at Operetta \: Senior Class Play 4; Honor 
Roll 1. 

She will conquer success. 



RUSSELL BEARD 

"Rnss" 

Fast Weymouth General Course 

.1 quiet and contented lad. 



KENNETH J. BRADEEN 

"Kenny" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Freshman Senior Part) \: Puppet Show 2. 
For him life flows by like a song. 



ELIZABETH L. BECK LORD 

"Betty" 

Weymouth Heights Practical Arts Course 

)-H Club 3: Waitress at Reflector Banquet 3; 
St\le Show 2. 

How nice and quiet she is! 



RAYMOND E. BUCHAN 

"Ray" "Zeke" "Buck" 

North Weymouth General Course 

Glee Club 1, 2: Harmon) Club 1. 2: Senior 
Prom Committee |: Basketball 3. 4: Intramural 
Basketball 1. 2: Football \: Wrestling 1, 2; 
Track 4. 

'le is always in one big, glorious rush. 



GERTRUDE F. BELL 

"Trudy" 

South We\ mouth Classical Course 

I iss Nominating Committee 5 C I iss Outing 
Committee 3: Student Council 1, 2; Cand) Girl 
<Il Operetta 3. 

A good companion is good company. 



WILLIAM BURNS 

"Bill" 

Weymouth l anding Business Course 

Christmas Part) Committee [; Football 3, 4: 
Baseball |. 

II e like him as a friend, as mi athlete, as 
student. 



43 



FREDERICK F. BUSSIERE 

"Fred" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 

Class Outing Committee 4; Intramural Basket- 
hall 2. 

.1 man he seems of cheerful yesterdays and 
confident to-morrows. 



THERESA J. CASSESE 

"Tree" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Four Year Honor Roll; Lunch Room Duty 4: 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate \: 100 
Words a Minute Gregg Transcription Certificate 
t- 

Silence is siveeter than speech. 



ALFRED \V. CADMAN 

"Caddy" 

North Weymouth General Course 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2. 3, 4. 

Work will hurl no man. 



JOSEPH J. CALLAHAN 

"Joe" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

( lass Prophecy Committee j; Football 2; Base- 
hall 3. j: Operetta 1; Senior Class Pla) \. 
Push on— keep moving. 



WILLARD E. CANNON 

"Red" "Will" 
Weymouth Landing General Course 
Sober as a judge, when the world is looking. 



ELENA I. CARACCIOLO 

"El" 

Cast Wevmouth Classical Course 

Class Nominating Committee 4; French Club 3, 
(.; Glee Club 2; Honor Roll 1; Usher at Oper- 
etta 3; Reflector Stall 2. \: Exchange Editoi 4; 
Senior Class l'la\ [. 

So glad, so healthy, sound, and whole. 



PHYLLIS L. CARUSO 

"Phyl" 

Fast We) mouth Business Course 

(lass Motto Committee 4; Freshman Senior 
Party j: Stenography Club 4; Gregg Theory 
Certificate \: 100 Words a Minute Gregg Tran- 
scription Certificate 4. 

1 good worker, a heller sport, and yet a bet- 
ter friend. 



ROSEMARIE CHRISTIE 

"Marie" "Chris" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Library Club 3, \: Stenography Club 4; Basket- 
hall 2, 3, (., Voile) Ball 1, 2, 3, 4; Field Hockey 
1: Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 2, 3, 4; Gym Dem- 
onstration 2, 3. j; Gregg Theory Certificate 4; 
Gregg too Word Certificate 4; Gregg 120 Word 
Certificate 4. 

To try is to succeed. 

VINCENT A. CIRIGLIANO 

"Jazz" "Zeke" 

Fast We) mouth Classical Course 

Senior Reception Committee 4: Glee club 1; 
Harmony Club 2; Football 3, 4; Basketball 4: 
Baseball |; Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4; Golf 1, 2, 3; 
Track 4. 

We notice that his stature doesn't prevent him 
from being a menace on the basketball floor. 



DOROTHY B. CLARE 

"Dot" "Dottie" 
Wevmouth Business Course 

Class Outing Committee j: Class Nominating 
Committee 3: Yollev Ball 1. 2: Baseball 1. 2; 
Field Hockev 2: Gym Exhibition 1. 

The will to do, the soul to dare. 

VIRGINIA A. COBB 

"Ginny" "Ginia" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Operetta 1: Glee Club 1. 2: Basketball 2: Voile) 
Ball 1. 2: Baseball i, 2; Field Hockey 2'; 
Gregg Theory Certificate 4. 

/ happy-go-lucky girl is she. 

AGNES M. COOPER 

"Aggie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Clothing Committee 4; Book Club 3: French 
Club 3; Theory Certificate 4. 

Oh, true in word and tried in deed. 

45 




4 6 



DORIS CORNELL 

"Dolly" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Gym Exhibition 2; Gregg Shorthand Certificate 
4- 

Nonsense and laughter reign. 



JOHN W. COUGHLIN 

"Jack" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Never worry. It doesn't pay. 

R. J E ANNETTE COWETT 



"Jen" 
Weymouth Landing 



'Nettie" 

General Course 



(.Ice Club 2; Book Club 3; Musical Revue 2; 
Lunch Room Duty 2, 3. \; Waitress at Reflector 
Banquet 2, 3. 

She is always bright and sunny. 



RUTH F. COWLES 

"Ruthie" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Voile) Ball 1. 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Gregg 
["heor) Certificate 4: Book Club 3. , 
Quiet, but does lots of thinking. 



JOSEPH CREHAN 

"Joe" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 
Athletic Council Dance Committee 1; Grad- 
uation Reception Committee 1: Football 1, 2,3, 
|: Captain |; Baseball 1, 2. 3, |; Basketball 1, 2, 
3, l; Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3. 

Man about town. 



ALBERT 



E. CROSSMAN 

"Mike" 



North Weymouth General Course 
Freshman Senior Part) Committee \; Glee Club 
3. (.; Vice-President 4; Track 2. y. Intramural 
Basketball 2. y Operetta 3; Junior Party Enter- 
tainment 3; Senior Class Play 4. 

/ am sure care's an enemy to life. 



CATHERINE M. E. DACEY 

"Kit" "Katie" 
South Weymouth Classical Course 

3. 4: 4-H Club 3: Who's Who 



French Clul 
Commit Ice | 



'J'aime mon francais. 



ELLEN F. COVLE 

l ast Weymouth Classical Course 

Class History Committee \: French Club 3, 4; 
Secretary \: Lunch Room Dttt\ 2. 3. 4; Operetta 
Cand) girls 4; Herald-Traveler Spelling Bee 
Finals 1. 2, 3, p Four Year Honor Roll. 
./ mind calm under difficulties. 



FRANCES I. CRANE 

"Fran" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
I shei at Senior Play 4. 

Ever ready as a friend. 



BLANCHE M. DAVIDSON 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Librar) Club 3; Gregg Theory Certificate 4. 
Still water runs very deep. 



RUTH E. DAVIS 

"Ruthie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Usher at Operetta ]: Clothing Committee y. 
Class Banquet Committee |. 

"Stenog" gives me the shivers. 



ROBERT CRAWFORD 

"Dudie" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 

( lass Outing Committee \; Senior Christmas 
Part) Committee 4: Basketball 2, 3: Football 
3, \: Track 3: Gym Exhibition 1, 2, 3, 4. 
He is full of joke and jest. 



M. VIRGINIA Di LORI A 

"Jinny" "Ginnia" 

N'oilh We\ mouth Business Course 

Field Hockey 1; Reflector Stall 2; Girls' Glee 
Club 2. |: Lunch Room Dut) 3, \; Waitress at 
"Reflector" Banquet 3: Book Club t; Freshman 
Senior Party Entertainment 4. 



47 




48 



HOWARD A. DEMPSEY 

"Jack" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Junior Decorating Committee 3: Wrestling 2, 3; 
Intramural Basketball 1, a, 3: Debating Club 3. 
Why work when you can play? 



JANET W. DURGIN 

"Jan" 

East Weymouth Business Coutsc 

Student Council 1; Library Club 3; Usher at 
Operetta 3; Jr. Prom Committee 3: Student 
Council Assistant |: Gregg Theory Certificate 4; 
Graduation Dance Committee 4. 

That music makes me waul to dance. 



WILFRED R. DeYOUNG 

"Will" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Operetta 1: Clothing Committee 4. 

School is a place to enjoy yourself. 



MARJORIE A. DURGIN 

"Midge" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

Senioi Christmas Part) Committee 4; Amateur 
Show 1; Senior Class Play 4. 

/•'((// of fun, ieit, and fire. 



HELEN L. DONOVAN 

"Sister" 

Weymouth Heights Business Course 

Athletic Association Dance Committee 2; Class 
Nominating Committee 4; Operetta 2; Candy 
Girl at Teachers' Pla\ 4. 

First comes fun, then work. 



GLADYS DWYER 

"Gladdic" 
North Weymouth Business Course 

Class Histor) Committee 4; French Club 3; Gym 
Exhibition 1; Reflector Staff 4; Usher at Oper- 
etta 1; Honor Roll 2; Junior High Office 3, 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4. 

.i jolly pal is long remembered. 



MARGARET A. DRISCOLL 

"Grete" 

North Weymouth General Course 

Book Club 3: Student Council 1, 2; Usher at 
Operetta \: Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 
4- 

She will go a long way in the right way. 



f. EDWARD DWYER 

"Eddie" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 

Football 3, \; Intramural Basketball 2: Class 
Nominating Committee 4; Senior Class Play 4; 
Graduation Dame Committee 4; Gym Exhi- 
bition 1, 2; Wrestling 3. 

He looks so jolly! 



DONALD P. DUDLEY 

"Ducky" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Who's Who Committee ]. 

How happy am I! From care I'm free! 



GEORGE S. EACOBACCI 

"Ecco" 

fast Weymouth Business Course 

Class Prophec) Committee 4; Class Outing 
Committee [.; Baseball 2, 3, [. 

Beware o\ a quiet boy and still water. 



JOSEPH L. DUNCAN 

"Joe" 

Weymouth Landing Techanical Course 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3; Assistant Wrest- 
ling Manager 3; J. V. Football 3. 

Oh, it's hard to get to school on time. 



EDWARD B. EATON 

"Eddie" 

East Weymouth General Course 

Operetta 1; Class Motto Committee 4; Gradu- 
ation Dance Decorating Committee 3. 

./ helping hand whenever needed. 



19 




5<> 



HELEN E. EVANS 

South Weymouth Business Course 

C.Iee Club 1; Basketball 2; Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 4. 

Quietness is a virtue few have. 



MARIE E. GAROFALO 

l ast Weymouth Classical Course 

Voile) Ball 2: French Club 3, 4; Reflector Staff 

3, \: Class Nominating Committee 3; Operetta 

Usher 4; Class History Committee 3. 

She who .says nothing does not commit herself. 



MADELON A. EVIRS 

North Wevmouth Practical Arts Course 

Freshman Senior Party Committee 4: Senior 
Christmas Partv Committee 4; Usher at Senior 
Plav. 

She blesses tlie world with hc> impartial 
sweetnesz. 



CHARLES S. FARRAR. Jr. 

"Charlie" 

East Wevmouth Business Course 

Intramural Basketball 3. j. 

A good friend iti many -ways. 



BRUCE F. FOX 

"Pete" 

North Weymouth Technical Course 

Student Council 1, 4: Vice-President 4; Junior 
Partv Committee 3; Class Outing Committee 3; 
Football 3. ): Graduation Oance Committee 4. 
Begone, dull care, thou and I shall ne'er agree. 



PHYLLIS L. GAROFALO 

"Red" "Phil" "Philly" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

basketball 1. 2. 3: Volley Ball 1, 2. 3; Baseball 1, 
2, 3; Musical Revue 2; Usher at Opeietta 3; Glee 
1, 2. 3; Field Hocke\ 1, 2; Gym Exhibition i, 2, 
3: Musical Revue 2; Usher at Operetta 3; Glee 
Club \: Operetta 4: Track 1, 2: Home Room 
Treasurer 4: Class Outing Committee 4; Har- 
mony 1. 

A goood pal is never forgotten. 



PHILIP S. GATELY, Jr. 

"Phil" "Grappler" 
North \Ve\ mouth Business Course 
Wrestling 2. 3. 4; Manager 4. 

Of humor kind anil free. 



MARY E. GATJGHEN 

"Mae" 

East Weymouth General Course 

Student Council 1: Glee Club 1: Harmony 1; 
Clothing Committee 4. 

Variety is the spice o) life. 



M. CAROLYN FURBISH 

"Carol" 

Weymouth Practical Aits Course 

St\le Show 2; Cooking Exhibition 2; Lunch 
Room I)ut\ 2. 3 1: Library Club 3: Waitress at 
"Reflector" Banquet 2, 3: Usher at Operetta 4. 

We have a quiet ladx in our midst. 



ROBERT GAY 

"Bob" 

Weymouth Business Course 

Band 1. 2, 3. |: Orchestra 3. \: Swing Band 3. 
Cass History, Committee }. 

/ musician in ow midst. 



GORDON P. GARDINER 



"Red" 
South Wevmouth 



'G. G." 

Business Course 



Operetta 4. 

He never misses enjoyment for homework. 



CHARLES GOODALE 

"Bud" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 

Football i, 2. 3: Tennis 1, 2, 3, 4: Manager 4: 
Usher at Football \: Class Prophecy Committee 
|; Senior Class Plav [. 

A man of few words. 



5 1 



GILBERT A. GOODWIN 

"Peanut" "Stinky" 

\Ve\ mouth Business Course 

(Am Team 1; Senior Christmas Party Com- 
mittee 4. 

A toast to a grand fellow. 



ERNEST HAN IAN 

"Ernie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Basketball 2; Football Jr. Varsity 3; Intramural 
Basketball 1,2,3, 4- 

The great end of life is not knowledge but 
action." 



EVELYN GORMAN 

Weymouth Classical Course 

Freshman Senior Party Committee 4; Class Mot- 
to Committee 4. 

She speaks softly and smiles sweetly. 



MARY A. HAN IAN 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Musical Revue 2; Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 4; Harmony Club 1. 

It is a fine thing to make yourself needed. 



IRENE B. GORMAN 

"Rene" "Dimples" 
South Weymouth Business Course 
Volley Ball 2; Operetta 4; Student Council 
Assistant 3: Lunch Room Cashier 3, 4; Glee 
Club 3, 4; Book Club 3, 4; Operetta and Revue 
3; Trade School Office 4; Freshman Senior 
Part} Committee 4; Reflector Staff 4; Class 
Prophecy Committee 4; Gregg Shorthand theo- 
rv Certificate 4. 

Smiling eyes, dimpled cheeks. 



EDITH GRACE 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

Hockey l; Student Council 4; Usher at Operetta 
2. 3: Reflector 3, 4: Debating Club 3; French 
Club 3: Class Prophecy CommittC" 
She has a train of admirers. 



CHRISTINE HARKINSON 

"Chris" 

South Weymouth General Course 

Candy Girl at Musical Revue 2; Candy Girl at 
leather's Play 4. 

Style, I am thy Slave. 



CHARLES W. HEGARTY 

"Ike" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Operetta 1; Band 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 2, 3, 4; 
Senior Prom Committee 4; Student Council 
Assistant 4; Gym Exhibition 2; Musical Revue 
2; Swing Baud 3. 

A little lad, but a great one. 



LUCILLE M. GREENE 

"Lou" 

fast Weymouth Classical Course 

Class Outing Committee 3, 4. 

Much ado about nothing. 



AGNES W. HENDRICKSON 

"Aggie" "Henny" .. 
North Weymouth Business Course 

Volley Ball 1; Basketball 1; Who's Who Com- 
mittee 1; Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificite 4. 
A -willing heart finds nothing impossible. 



OLAVI HAKALA 

"Hacky" 

fast Wevmouth Technical Course 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2; Usher at Football 
2, 3; Senior Class Play 4. 

A good scholar. 



JOHN HERLIHY 

"Chesty" 

East Weymouth Agricultural Course 

Student Council 2: Intramural Basketball 2, 
3: Trade Basketball 4. 
Keep thy farm and thy farm will keep thee. 



53 




54 



WILLIAM R. HILL 

"Hud" 

East Weymouth Classical Course 

(.oil 3. 4: Intramural Basketball 1, 2; Varsity 
Basketball 3. 4; Class Nominating Committee 4; 
Freshman-Senior Party Committee 4. 

He lives long that lives well. 



EDWIN HOUSTON, Jr. 

"Eddie" 

South Weymouth Technical Course 

Radio Club 3, 4: President of Debating Club \: 
Usher at Football 3, 4; Usher at Operetta 4; 
Tennis 4. 

Ready, willing and able. 



GRACE E. HOLBROOK 

"Gracie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Student Council 1; Assistant Student Council 
2; Gym Exhibition 1; Home Room Treasurer 3; 
Class Nominating Committee 4; Graduation 
Reception Committee 4. 

Always bright and sunny. 



GORDON P. HOLDER 

Weymouth Technical Course 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2; Debating Club 4; 
Senior Class Play 4; Home Room Spelling 
Champion i, 2: Class Prophecy Committee 4; 
Freshman-Senior Party Committee 4. 

A good man happy is a common good. 



ELMER J. HOLLIS 
South Weymouth Business Course 
Tennis 3. 4; 

"We must have reasons for speech but -we need 
none for silence." 



MARGARET V. HOLMES 



"Peggy 1 



\Ve\ mouth 



Business Course 



Reflector Staff 3, 4: Usher at Operetta 3; Senior 
Prom Committee 4; Senior Class Play 4; French 
Club 3: Book Club 4; Debating Club 4: Gregg 
Shorthand Theory Certificate 4. 

It's good to be merry and ivise. 



MARGARET HOWE 

"Peg" "Peggy" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Gym Exhibition 1; Usher at Operetta 3: Senior 
Prom Committee 4. 

True to her friend and word. 



MARGUERITE D. HOWSBERGER 

"Miggles" 

Weymouth Classical Course 

French Club 3; Class Banquet Committee 4. 
Laughing, laughing, all day long. 



BARBARA HUNT 

"Barb" "Barby" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Gym Exhibition 1, 2: Basketball 4; Usher at 
Senior Class Play 4. 

A friend worth having. 



GEORGE HUNTER 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Easy come, easy go. 



RALPH E. HUNTER. Jr. 

East Weymouth General Course 

Intramural Basketball 1; Book Club 3.4: Second 
Vice President 3, 4. 

Personality and scholarship bespeak the man. 



JAMES HOUGHTON 

"Jimmie" "Skee" ALYCE E. HVNES 

South Wevmouth General Course Weymouth Heights Practical Arts Course 

Track 2, 3. 4: Intramural Basketball 1, 2; Cloth- (,| t . t . club 1, 3; Usher at Teachers' Play 4: 

ing Committee 4. Reflector Staff 3. 

A workman is known by his work. A good pal is long remembered. 

55 



BARBARA [LIFFE 

"Barb" 

Soutli \Ve\ mouth Business Course 

Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate j: Gregg 
Transcription Certificate \: Class Outing Com- 
mittee 4: Student Council 3, [.. 

/ merry heart that laughs at rare. 



ALDA H. JONES 

"Al" 

Soutli Weymouth Business Course 

Glee Club 1; Harmon) Club i; Christmas Party 
Entertainment 3. 

She is a mirror of sincerity. 



WARREN F. JANELLE 

"Burl" 

East Weymouth Technical Course 
( kiss Countr) j. 

// silence were golden, lie would be in the poor 
house. 



BEVERLY JONES 

"Bev" 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Chairman of Class Banquet Committee 4: Glee 
Club 1; Senior Play Usher 4: Home Room Mes- 
senger 2, 3. 

Gay, good nature sparkles in her eyes. 



DAVID H. JOHNSON 

"Dave" 

Nortb Weymouth Technical Course 

Cross Country 2. 3. 4: Track i. 2. 3, 4: Junior 
Decorating Committee 3: Class Prophecy Com- 
mittee 4: Student Council 3, 4. 

Leave me alone, I wish to study. 



ELEANOR JOHNSON 

"Johnnie" "Ellie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Senior Prom Committee 4: Volley Ball t; 
Basketball 1, 2; Track 1: Baseball 1, 2; Gym 
Exhibition 1. 2: Field Hockey 1, 2; Gregg Short- 
hand rheorv Certificate 4: Usher at Teachers' 
Play 4. 

What lies beyond that quiet exterior? 



ROBERT E. JORGENSEN 

"Jorgy" 

North Weymouth Technical Course 

Junior Party Committee 3; Freshman Senior 
Part) Committee 4; Class History Committee 4: 
Student Council 1; Class Marshal 4. 

A good sport and a friend indeed. 



MARGARET A. JOYCE 

"Joycie" 

North \\'e\ mouth Classical Course 

Class Nominating Committee 3, 4: Student 
Council 1, 3. 

It's nice to be natural when you're naturally 
nice. 



ETHEL JOHNSON 

"Eth" "Johnny" 
North Weymouth Business Course 
Ti ue to her work, her word and her friends. 



PAUL F. JOHNSON 

"Shafty" "Jason" 
Weymouth Landing General Course 

Rin« Committee: Senior Prom \: Athletic Dance 
4: Victor) Dance 4: Student Council Dance 4; 
Basketball j: Track 2; Student Council 1, 2; 
Operetta 1. 2; Freshman Setiioi Party Entertain- 
ment 1: Junior Party Committee 3; Intramural 
Basketball i, 2, 3. 

His dances are a real treat, 

I tliink you'll find he's hard to beat. 



MARY E. JOYCE 

"Dusty" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

Chairman of Class Prophecy Committee 4; 4-H 
Club 3: Leader j: French Club Treasurer 3; 
French Club President 4: Student Council 
Assistant [. 

She bus 11 merry smile and a pleasing disposition. 



M ARY KARA I AN 

"May" 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Gregg Shorthand Theor) Certificate 4. 

A woman of few ivords. 



57 




5§ 



NELLIE E. KARPINSKAS 

"Nell" 

North Weymouth General Course 

Clothing Committee j: Junior Prom Entertain- 
ment 3. 

// silence ioere golden, she would be rich. 

FRED W. KARSTUNEN 

"Freddie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Intramural Basketball 1. 3. 

Well liked by all. 



DOROTHY L. KENISTON 

"Dot" "Dottie" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Freshman Senior Parts 4; Usher at Senior Class 
l'la\ 4; Glee Club 2: Harmony Club l; Assistant 
Student Council 3; Shorthand Certificate 4. 
Sweetness, goodness in Iter person shine 
To keep us happy all the time. 

MARION A. KNOX 

"Shorty" "Shrimp" 
Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Senioi Prom Committee 4; Senior Prom Dec- 
orating Committee 4; Gvm Exhibition 1, 2; 
Ushei at Teachers' Play; Shorthand Theory 
Certificate \: Transcription Theory Certificate 
4- 

Wee bit of lassie, why doth thee not grow? 



RITA M. KEARNS 

" Keamsie" 
East Weymouth Classical Course 

Operetta 1. \\ Glee Club 4: Student Council As- 
sistant 2: French Club 3, 4: Vice-President 4; 
ReHectoi Stall 4: Class Prophecy Committee 4. 
The mildest manners and the gentlest heart. 



ELIZABETH G. KELLY 

"Kel" 

East We\ mouth Classical Course 

Junior Decorating Committee: Basketball 1; 
(.lee Club 4: Operetta 4: Candy Girl at Oper- 
etta 3. 

She loves a good time. 



GAROLD E. KELSO 

"Kel" 

East Weymouth General Course 

Basketball 1, 2. 3: Football 3. 
A little nonsense now and tlien is relished by 
the best of men. 



ANNA L. KENDRICK 

"Nan" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

French Club 3; Book Club 3; Office Assistant 4; 
Lunch Room Cashier 2, 3, 4; Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 4: Transcription Theory Certificate 
4: Operetta Usher 3; Football Souvenirs 4; 
Honor Roll 4. 

Her friends, she has many. 
Her foes, has she any? 



MARY M. LAM BE 

"May" " Lambie" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Christmas Party Committee 4; Book Club 3, 
Class Prophecy Committee 4; Office Assistant 4; 
Basketball a; Baseball 2; Voile) Ball 2: Field 
Hockey 1, 2: Operetta 1; Glee Club 1; Messen- 
ger 1. 4: Shorthand Theory Certificate 4; Four- 
Year Honor Roll; Home Room Spelling Win- 
ner 4: Reflector Staff 4; Gregg Transcription 
Theorv Certificate. 

The world must have great minds. 

CHARLES D. LEAHY 

"Charlie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Class Motto Committee 4; Chairman Clothing 
Committee 4: Dance Committee 3; Cross Coun- 
try 2; Indoor t rack 1; G\m Exhibition 1; Intra- 
mural Basketball 1. 2, 3, 4: Spanish Club 2, 3; 
Basketball 2. 3; Baseball 2, 3: Hockey Manage! 
a. 3- 

"Why aren't they all content like me?" 
T. STANLEY LEARY 

"Stan" "Spike" 
Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Senioi Christmas Party Committee 4: Who's 
Who Committee 4: Class Banquet Committee 4; 
Idol ball 1, 2. 3; Intramural Basketball 1, 3, 4; 
( ioss Country 1, 2; Gvm Exhibition 1; Indoor 
1 ia<k 1; Lunch Room Duty 2, 3. 

"Happy am I! From care I'm free— 
.Why aren't they all content like me?" 

ROSE R. LIPSKY 

"Rosie" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

French Club 3, 1; Junior Outing Committee 3; 
Who's Who Committee 4; Four Year Honor 
Roll. Reflector Staff 3, 4; Maroon and Gold 
Manual 3. 

A laughing eye, a merry smile- 
Tend to make a girl worth while. 



59 



KATHRYN E. LOBERG 

"Kay" 

North Weymouth General Course 

Glee Club i; Basketball 1, a 3, 4: Captain 2; 
Volley Ball 1. 2, 3, 4; Baseball 2, 3, 4: Field 
Hockey i, 2; Gym Exhibition 2, 4; Style Show 2. 
Forever smiling, always on the go 
From her blithe spirit happiness doth flow. 

JOSEPH L. LOCKARY 

"Joe" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

( lass Nominating Committee 4; Glee Club 2, 
3: Baseball 3; Basketball 2, 3. Intramural Bas- 
ketball 1 . 2, 3. 

What's the use of hurrying, I'll gel there. 

J. PETER LOUGHAN 

"Pete" 

South Weymouth General Course 

Junior Decorating Committee 3; Reflector Stall 
\: Wrestling 1, 2; Track 3, 4; Lunch Room 
Duty 2. 3. 

.1 circus in himself. 

ALICE G. LONG 

-.//•• 

North Weymouth Business (ionise 

Cand) Giil at Teachers' Play 2; Junior Decor- 
ating Committee 3; Class Motto Committee 4; 
French Club 3: Head Usher at Operetta (: En- 
tertainment Freshman-Senior Part) 1: Gym Ex- 
hibition 2: Basketball 1, 2: Volley Ball 2; Foot- 
ball Souvenirs \; Junior High Office Assistant 4; 
Gregg Theorv Certificate 4: Reflector Stall 4. 
Quietness often slimes worth. 



JOHN J. LONG 

"Bunny" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Class Outing Committee 4: Basketball 2. 3: 1 1 1 - 
tramural Basketball 1, 2, 3. 1; Gym Exhibition 
1 : Student Council 1 : 

A good worker, a good sport, and a sincere 
friend. 



LOUIS F. LYSAKOWSKI 

"Louie" 

North Weymouth General Course 

Athletic Dance 4: Football 1, 2, 3. 4; Wrestling 
3. |; Student Council 3, 4; Student Council Pres- 
ident 4. 

All hail to an all around good sport! 



MURIEL J. MacDONALD 

"Butch" "Mac" 
Weymouth Landing Business Course 

(.lee Club 2: Gym Exhibition 1; Student Coun- 
cil |: Lunch Room Duly 4; Senior Play Usher 4. 
Silent, calm, reserved. 



MYRTLE V. MacDONALD 

"Bud" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Senior Christmas Party 4; Usher at Senior Play 
t: Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4. 
Giggling at this, giggling at that, 
/ml nobody knows what she's giggling at. 



MARGARET J. MacDONALD 

" l ggy" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 

Junior Party Committee 3; Glee Club 3, 4; Fi- 
nancial Secretary 4; Operetta 3; Student Council 
4: Lunch Room Duly 4. 

"Iggy" looks quiet at first but look again. 



WALTER H. MacLEOD 

"Mac" 

North Weymouth Technical Course 

Class Prophecy Committee 4; Radio Club 3: 
Football Cashier 2. 3, (.; Operetta Ticket Collec- 
tor \. 

Head and shoulders above the crowd. 



EDWARD L. MADDEN. Jr. 

"Eddie" 

North Weymouth General Course 

Student Council Assistant \: Basketball 2. 3. 4; 
l oot ball 2. 3. 

A friend worth having. 



CHARLES G. MARPLE 

"Charlie" 

Weymouth Heights Technical Course 

Debating Club 1; Glee Club 3,1; Radio Club 1; 
I lack [; Operetta 3. 4. 

Wisdom is better than rubies. 



Gt 



MARIE MARTIN 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Clothing Committee 4; Clcc Club 1; Book Club 
3: Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4. 
Fun before work. 



ROGER McALEER 

"Mac" 

North Weymouth Technical Course 

Class Motto Committee 4: Senior Christmas 
l'art\ 4: Track Team 1; Gym Exhibition 1. 2, 3; 
Wrestling \: Senior Class play 4. 

Play first work afterwards. 



EVELYN Mc ANDREWS 

"Mickey" -Red,, 

North WeMiiouth Business Course 

Student Council Hand Book Committee 4; Bas- 
ketball 2. 3, 4: Baseball 1, 2, 3: Volley Ball 1, 2, 
3, j: Field Hockev 1. 2: Gym Exhibition 2, 3; 
Library Assistant 3, (; Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate \. 

She excels in sports. 



HELEN M. McGRORY 

"Magee" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

Book Club |: (.lee Club \: Track 2; Gym Exhi- 
bition 1.2; Reflector |. 

Never changing as a friend. 



JOSEPH M. McKENZIE 

"Joe" "Mac" 
Weymouth Landing Technical Course 

Junior Nominating Committee 3; Band 2. 3, 4: 
Orchestra 4; Operetta 3; Intramural Basketball 
1. 2; Reflector Stall Entertainment 3. 

He is lull of qusctions. 



PAUL V. McNULTY 

"Mac" 

North Weymouth General Course 
Wrestling 2, 3, \: Track 1, 3; Gym Exhibition 3. 
li e have a wrestler among us 



justin l. McCarthy 

••/<"/" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Glee Club 1. 3: Band 1, 2, 3. 4: Operetta 1 , 3, 4. 
.1 dangerous driver. 



GLADYS M. McCULLOCk 

"Ginger" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Field Hoike\ 2: Basketball 2. 

Sunny as the day is long. 



JAMES McFARLAND 

"Mac" "Inn" 
East Weymouth Agricultural Course 

Chairman of Program Committee of Wevmouth 
High Four H-Club 4; Class Nominating Commit 
tee j.; Conservation Club j: Treasurer 2, 3; Veg- 
etable fudging Team 1, 2; Poultry fudging 
Team 2. 3, \: Flower and Fruit fudging Team 
3. |: I)air\ fudging \: Senior Play ); Reflector |: 
Winner of Legion Oratorical Contest 4. 

. J mother's pride, a farthcr's joy. 



WALTER J. McQUADE 

"Jimmy" "Bowser" "Mac" "Charlie" 
East Weymouth General Course 

Junior Prom Entertainment Committee 3: Gym 
Team 3. \: I laik Manager 3. \: Student Council 
Why should I study? 



NATHALIE MEANS 

"Nat" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Glee Club 2, 3. ]; Operetta 2. 3. |. 

Silence is "olden. 



JOHN MEHRMAN 

"Johnny" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Wrestling 1. 2. 3. \; Football 2. 3: Gym Exhi- 
bition 2. 3; Student Council 1. 

Hearts flutter when he goes by. 

&3 



MARY E. MELVILLE 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

Freshmen Senior Party Committee (: Class Pro- 
phecy Committee 4: Glee Club 4: Gym Exhibi- 
tion t; Exhibtion 1: Operetta 2. 4: Operetta 
Usher 3. 

Here is a true friend. 



ALICE M. MURRAY 

"AT "Allie" 
North Weymouth Business Course 

Senior Prom Committee (: Class Outing Com- 
mittee 3: Basketball 3; Yollcv Ball 3: Gym Ex- 
hibition 1, 3; Baseball 3; Room Messenger 3. 
Here's "pep" personified. 



SADIE MESSIKIAN 

"Bunny" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Basketball 2: Gym Exhibition 1, 2. 

She is always briglil and merry. 



CHARLES XV. MUSTER 

"Turk" 

South Weymouth Agricultural Course 

His Selection of lies is the pride of his e\es. 



MARION METCALF 

"Red" "Carrots" 
East Wevmouth Business Course 

Glee Clul Basketball 1. 

./ qui urc miss with a pleasant smile. 



FRANK NESS 
South Weymouth Technical Course 
Clothing Committee 4. 

A gentleman of quiet humor 



'GRID H. MONK 

Shorty" 
lOUih Technical Course 

Entertainment Committee Junior Party 3: Dec- 
orating Committee Junior Part) 3; Graduation 
Decorating Committee 3: Christmas Party En- 
tertainment Committee 4: Chairman Class His- 
tory Committee \: Athletic Dance Committee 2: 
Glee Club 1, 4: French Club 3; Basketball 1; 
Gym Exhibition 2: Student Council 2; Musical 
Rcmic 2: Student Council Manual 2. 3: Football 
Booklet 2: Candy Girl at Teachers' play 2, 3: 
Usher at Operetta 3: Room Messenger 1; Senior 
( lavs Pla\ |. Four Year Honoi Roll. 

// she could only cook. 



DOROTHY M. MOORE 

"Dot" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

( lass Nominating Committee 4; Class Outing 
Committee \. 

A good sport. 



ROBERT B. MORSE 

"Bob" "Morsy" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

A likeable fellow. 



HOWARD W. NICHOLS 

"Hoxedy" "Nick" 
Lovell's Corner Busin'ess Course 

Who's Who Committee \: Freshman Senior 
Part) Committee \: Gym Team |. 

His is the nature of a sportsman. 



[AMES A. NOLAN 

"Rima" 

Fast Weymouth General Course 

[unioi Party Entertainment 3: Basketball 3. \: 
Golf Team 3, \: Gym Exhibition 1; Room Mes- 
senger 1. 

//c is quiet until you know him. 



EMILY D. NORKUS 

"Em" "Kid" "Dot" 
South Weymouth Business Course 

Glee Club 1, 2: Basketball 1. 

Pleasure before business. 



65 




6b 



THOMAS F. O'HARA 
Weymouth Landing Business Course 
Class Prophecy Committee 4. 

Wise men say Utile. 



JOSEPH PACKARD 

"Gttney" 

LoveU's Corner Business Course 

Intramural Basketball 1,2,3; Tennis i, 2; Fresh- 
man Senior Party 4. 

Never let school stand in the way of pleasure. 



MYRTLE E. OLSON 

"Myrt" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Glee Cluba; Usher at Operetta \: Tennis ream 
4; Basketball 2. 

—And she skated merrily on. 



ANN M. O'NEIL 

"Peggy" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

Chairman Nominating Committee 3; Dance 
Committee 3: Class Banquet Committee 3; 
Chairman Class Motto Committee 4; Glee Club 

1, 2. 3; Operetta 1; Home Room Messenger 1, 

2, 3: Usher for Revue 3. 

The mirror of sincerity. 



LENNA PALMER 

"Peepe" 

North Weymouth Classical Gourse 

[■'oui Year Honor Roll; Student Council 1, 2, 3; 
Executive Board t, 2: Dance Committee 1, 2. 3; 
Lunch Room Duty 1, 2, 3: Operetta 1; Glee 
Club 1 : Freshman Senior Party F.ntertainer 1 : 
Athletic Ball Committee 1; Victory Ball Commit- 
tee 1; Junior Party Committee 3; Memorial Day 
Speaker 3: Senior Reception Decorating Commit- 
tee 3: Student Council Handbook Staff 2. 3, 4; 
D. A. R. Good Citizenship Candidate 4: Class 
Secretary 3. 1. 

Dnin/x, hind, obliging, street, Besides all these, 
she's clever and neat. 



GEORGE PAR DO 

"Pard" 

Weymouth General Course 

Intramural Basketball 1, 2, 3; Class Outing Com- 
mittee j. 

He is a quiet youth— at limes! 



KATHERINE A. ORCUTT 

"Kay" "Kalic" "Kalh" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Class Prophecy Committee \: Who's Who Com- 
mittee \: Senior Prom Decorating Committee 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4. 

A willing helper to all. 



DOROTHY PARKER 

"Dot" "Dotlie" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Band 1. 2. 3, 1; Class Outing Committee 3; 
Reflector Stall 1; Freshman Senior Part) 
Committee \: Gregg Shorthand Theory Cer- 
tificate \: Graduation Reception Committee 4. 
Jolly, goad matured and sweet. Here's a girl 
you'd love to meet. 



LOUISE A. OUELLET 

"Lizzy" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Operetta Usher \: Baseball 1. 2: Volley Ball 1, 
2; G\m Exhibition 1. 

She gazed at mam though she loved hut one. 



CONCETTA G. PASSERO 

"Connie" 

I .ist Weymouth Classical Course 

Four Year Honor Roll: Reflector Staff 2. 3. \: 
Literary Editor 3, 4; French Club 3. \: Book 
Club 3. \: Student Council Assistant 3: Class Pro- 
phecy Committee 1: Honorary Member of Wey- 
mouth Monday Club \: Valedictorian; Astron- 
omy Club 3: 

Few things me impossible to diligence and skill. 



RITA OUELLET 

"Reet" 

Weymouth Landing Classical Course 
Unselfish service is the final test of character. 



LAURA 

Fast We\ mouth 



V. PASSERO 

Business Course 



Reflector Staff 3, 4: Book Club 3; French Club 
3; Class Nominating Committee |: Class Pro- 
phecy Committee 4; Four Year Honor Roll; 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4. 
By the force of her own merit she makes her wax 



'/ 




68 



RENEE PATENAUDE 

Weymouth Heights Business Course 

Operetta 2; Girls' Glee Club 2, 4; Mixed Glee 
Club 2. 

A laughing eye, a merry smile lend to make a 
girl worth while. 



ELIZABETH H. PIKE 

"Betty" 

Weymouth Classical Course 

Who's Who Committee 4; Library Club 3, 4. 
Here is a girl you will find always ready and 
always kind. 



FRAXK PECORARO 
"Pickles 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Wrestling Team 1, 2; Basketball Team 1, 2; Golf 
1. 2, 3: Baseball Assistant Manager 3; Baseball 
Manager 4; Senior Christmas Party Committee 
4' Chairman of Refreshment Committee at Sen- 
ior Prom 4. 

Small in stature, great in athletics. 



SHIRLEY L. PINGREE 

"Shirl" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Gym Exhibition 1; Reflector Staff 4; Gregg The- 
ory Certificate 4; Senior Prom Decorating Com- 
mittee 4; Class Outing Committee 4. 
Not very tall, >iot very small, but fair and 
sweet and loved by all. 



ROSE PERRONE 

"Rosie" "Ro" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Field Hockey 1; Basketball 2; Baseball 2; Gym 
Exhibition 2; Gregg Shorthand Theory Certi- 
ficate 4. 

Little, but oh, my! 



YVETTE PLOURDE 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Senior Play Usher 3; Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 4; 100 words a Minute Gregg Short- 
hand Transcription 4. 

She has a nice manner and a winning way. 



ANDREW L. PETERS 

"Andy" 

Lovell's Corner General Course 

Say nothing and you have nothing to deny. 



GLORIA A. POINSETT 

"Glo" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Usher at Operetta 4; Class History Committee 4: 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4; 100 Word 
a Minute Gregg Transcription Certificate 4; 
Honor Roll 1 . 

A good sport, a good friend, a worker on whom 
you can depend. 



ANTHA PHILLIPS 

"Ann" "Phil" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Operetta Cand) Girl 2: Class Histor) Commit- 
tee 4. 

Always cheerful and full of fun, with a gleaming 
smile that rivals the sun; 



JOSEPH A. POIRIER 

"Joe" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Freshman Senior Party 1, Amateur Show 1; 
Track Team 2, 4: Cross Country 4; 

Napoleon was also a great man. 



THERESA PIGGUITO £RWIN £ pRAy 

"Terry" 

Shark 

East Wevmouth Business Course ,, r . T ,. „ . „ 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate \. Band 2, 3; Clothing Committee 1. 

Quiet at first, but wait awhile. He is wise who speaks little. 



69 




7° 



MILDRED X. ROBINSON 

"Millie" "Mimi" 
North Weymouth Business Course 

Field Hockey 1, 2; Indoor Baseball 1. 2. 3; Volley 
Ball 1. 2. 3: Senior Christmas Party Committee 
Who's Who Committee 4. 

Ouiet and Still, yet pleasant always. 



BERNARD L. RUGGLES, JR. 

"Winnie" "Rug" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 

Glee Club 2; Tennis 4; Class Banquet Com- 
mittee 4. 

A quiet exterior conceals much. 



PAUL V. ROCHE 

East Weymouth Technical Course 

Class President 3. 4: Band 1, 2. 3. 4; Orchestra 2, 
3. 4: Debating Club 1, 4: Astronomy Club 3; 
Glee Club 2; Student Council 1, 2. 3, 4; Vice 
President of Student Council 3; Gym Exhibition 
3; Four Year Honor Roll; Student Council 
Dance Committee 2, 3. 4; Freshman Senior Par- 
ty Entertainment 1; Laboratory Assistant 4. 
Personality is the first rung up the ladder of 
success. 



LUCY M. RUSSO 

"Lu" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Basket-ball 1. 2; Gym Exhibition 1, 2; Enter- 
tainment Committee of Junior Party 3: 
Senior Play Usher 4. 

Harsh toward herself, toward others full of 
truth. 



MARY G. ROCKWOOD 

"Skeets" 



East Weymouth 



Classical Course 



Harmony Club 1: Glee Club 1; Student Council 
1; Student Council Assistant 4: Library Club 3; 
4; Book Club Prize Winner 3: Honor Roll 1; 
Candy Girl at Teacher's Play and Operetta 2; 
Home Room Spelling Bee Winner 2: Class His- 
tory Committee 4. 

The reward of a thing -well done is to have done 
it. 



GEORGE F. RON AX 
South Weymo.uth Business Course 

Harmony Club 2; Class History Committee 4. 
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield. 



DOROTHY M. SAUNDERS 

"Dot" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Basketball 3: Gregg Shorthand Certificate \; 
Class Banquet Committee 4. 

Ouiet is she till help you need. 



MARY M. SAVAGE 

"Mae" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Senior Play Usher 4: Gregg Shorthand Theor) 
Certificate 4. 

The world means something to the capable. 



JOSEPH W. ROSS 



"Hoppy' 
East We\mouth 



"Speed" 
Business Course 



Football 2. 3. 4: Baseball 4; Class Nominating 
Committee 4: Class Prophecy Committee 4. 
Pla\ up, play up, and play the game. 



BARBARA YV. S W ARY 

"Barb" 



South We\ mouth 



Classical Course 



French Club 3, 4: Class Prophecy Committee 4 
Freshman Senior Part) Entertainment \ 
Teachers' Play Candy Seller 4: Student Counci 
Handbook Committee 3: Class Dues Collectoi | 
Gym Exhibition Accompanist 2. 

Girl of a thousand smiles. 



PRISCILLA M. ROUNDS 

"Cilia" 



North Weymouth 



Classical Course 



Musical Revue Candy Sale Committee 2; Oper- 
etta and Revue Usher 3; French Club 3: Stu- 
dent Council Handbook Committee 3. 

They can conquer who think they can. 



CLARENCE A. SCIOSCIA 

"Clarie" "Tippie" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Not too serious, not too gay, a good feltoi 



CORA F. SEW ALL 

"Susie" 

Weymouth Landing Practical Arts Course 

Candy Girl at Senior l'hn i, 2; Lunch Room 
I)ut\ 2. 3; Waitress at Reflet toi Banquet 2. 3; 
Red Cross Certificate 4: Ushei .11 Operetta |: 
Clothing Committee 4. 

Tin- victory of success is half won when one 
gains the habit of work. 

JEAN A. SHATFORD 

"Ginger" 

Weymouth Business Course 

Gym 3: Glee Clu!> 2, 3, 4. 

Hofie is the lasl thing that we lose. 

ELEANOR M. SHEPPARD 

"El" "Shep" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Girls' Glee Club 2; Home Room Messenger 3; 
Christmas Part) Entertainment j. 

She is gentle, site is sh\, 
But there's mischiej in her eye. 

DAVID W. SJOSTEDT 

"Davy" 

Weymouth Landing General Course 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4: Track 1, 2, 3. 4; Cross Country 
1. 2, 3, 4: Wrestling 1, 2, 3, 4; Co-Captain 2, 3; 
Senior Prom Committee 4: Student Council As- 
sistant 3-4; Gym Exhibition 1, 2, 3. 4; Intra- 
mural Basketball 1. 2. 3, 4; Operetta 2, 4; 
Musical Revue 3. 

Those move easiest idio have learned to dance. 

DOROTHY E. SLOCUMB 

"Dot tie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
They're only truly great who are truly good. 

MARGARET SPILLANE 

"Margie" "Midge" 

Last Weymouth Business Course 

Usher at Senior Class Play 4: Girl's Glee Club 
1 , 2. 

She's a quiet girl— sometimes. 

WILLIAM SPILLANE 

"Betty" 

North Wevmouth General Course 

Always on the go. 



EVERETT H. STAPLES 

"Duke" 

Weymouth Heights General Course 
Glee Club 1. 2; Debating Club i. 

The understudy to Daniel Webster. 



MARGUERITE STARKEY 

"Peg" 

North Weymouth Classical Course 

Student Council 1, 2, 3: Student Council Hand- 
book Staff 2, 3: Glee Club 1; Operetta 1; Usher 
at Operetta 3: Senior Reception Decorating 
Committee 3: Junior Party Committee 3; Ath- 
letic Ball Committee 1; Gym Exhibition 1; Stu- 
dent Council Dance and Decorating Committee 
1. 2, 3; Lunch Room Duty 1, 2, 3; Victory Ball 
Committee 2; School Ring Committee 2; Basket- 
ball 1; Class Treasurer 3, 4. 

A girl everyone admires. 



GRACE STEVENS 

"Steve" "Stevie" 

North Weymouth Business Course 

Class Nominating Committee 3; Christmas Party 
Committee- 4; Girls' Glee Club 3, 4; Basketball 
1; Volley Ball 1, 2, 3; Baseball i, 2, 3; Field 
Hockey 1. 

An infectious giggle, an uproarious laugh. 



DOROTHEA J. STONELY 

"Dot" 

last Wevmouth Business Course 

We have a new-comer in our in idst. 



G. MARJORIE SWAYNE 

"Margie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate |. 
Thought I ill com cnlration on the task in hand 
is a quality worthy of attainment . 

RALPH E. SWEENEY 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Student Council 1 ; Cross Country 2: Track 2: 
[unioi Ushei 3; Tennis 3. \: Assistant Business 
Manager of Reflector 3; Business Manager \: 
Hook C lub 1; Senioi Prom Committee [, 
Society demands well-dressed gentlemen. 



7:1 




74 



GORDON TEAGUE 

"Teagie" 

North Wevmouth General Course 

Clothing 4; C.lee Club 1; Book Club \. 

Soiling smoothly along. 



VIRGINIA M. TRAVERSE 

"Ginnie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 
Operetta Usher 4; Harmons Club 1. 

.1 cheerful smile, a sunny disposition. 



GEORGE THOMAS 

South Weymouth Technical Course 

Class Outing Committee 3: Class Prophecy Com- 
mittee 4: Class Nominating Committee 3. 
' The '/ires' are going to top the league this 
year." 



RUTH J. TRENEAR 

"Trucky" 

South Weymouth Classical Course 

Four-Year Honor Roll; Reflector Staff 2, 3. 4; 
French Club 3, 4; Operetta 1; Glee Club 1; 
Spelling Bee 1, 4; Candy Girl at Teachers' Play 
|; Graduation Decorating Committee 3; Class 
Nominating Committee 4; Class Outing Com- 
mittee 4. 

"/ am little but I can do much." 



ROBERT THRELFALL 

"Bob" 

Weymouth Heights Classical Course 
Football 2; Operetta 3. 

/ came, I saw, I conquered. 



BELMONT E. TRUDELL 

"Trudy" "Bell" 
North Weymouth Business Course 

Who's Who Committee (: Wrestling 2, 3, \: 
Cioss Country 1; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Small in stature but great in spirit. 



RUTH S. TIRRELL 

Lovell's Corner Business Course 

Class Piophecs Committee \: (.lee Club 1, 4; 
Voiles Ball 1. 2; Basketball 1. 2. 3. Baseball 1. 
Clear the way, here I come. 



FLORICE J. TUTTLE 

"Flo" 

Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Who's Who Committee 4. 

Silence gives consent. 



JEAN A. TOMPKINS 

"Red" 

South Wevmouth Classical Course 

Class Piophecs Committee 4; Glee Club 1. 2; 
Book Club 4; Gym Exhibition 1; Basketball 1. 
Actions speak louder than words. 



ANNE G. TOOMEV 

East Weymouth Classical Course 

Four-Year Honor Roll; Reflector Stair 2, 3, 4; 
Editor-in-chief 4; Baseball 1, 2; Basketball 1. 2: 
Voiles Ball 1. 2; Track 1; Gym Exhibition 1; 
Athletic Award 1. 2; Astronoms Club 2: Home 
Room Spelling Champion 2; Chess Club 3: 
Library Club 3, 4; French Club 3. 4: Saluta- 
torian 4. 

Jack of all trades. 



DOROTHY A. VANASSE 

"Dot" "Van" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Harmon) Club 1; Senior Prom Decorating Com- 
mittee 4; Glee Club 1; Basketball 1, 2. 3. \: 
Captain 4; Operetta 3; Volley Ball 1. 2, 3. \: 
Baseball 1. 2. 3, 4; Gym Exhibition 1. 2, 3. (.; 
Band 1, 2, 3. 4; Tennis 4; Gregg Shorthand 
Theory Certificate 4. 

In the classroom she's a riot. 

You just can't keep lie) quiet. 



ANNA A. VARTANIAN 

"Ann" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Girl's Glee Club 1, 3. 4; Mixed Glee Club 1: 
Chess club 3; Honor Roll 1; Gregg Shorthand 
I heors Certificate 4; Room Messenger [. 
Once a friend, aliuays a friend. 



lb 




76 



EILEEN F. VICINI 



DOBSON L. WEBSTER 



"Ei" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Usher at Senior Pla\ 4: Glee Club 3. y. Operetta 
3. 4: Senior Prom Decorating Committee 4; 
Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4: Gym 
Exhibition 1, 2; Basketball 1. 2; Volley Ball 1, 2; 
Baseball 1. 2; Field Hocke\ 1. 2. 

Don't get me started! 



■■Dick" "Dobbin" 
South Weymouth Classical Course 

Basketball 1. 2, 3. (; Wrestling 1; Student 
Council 1: Gym Exhibition 2; Track 2. 3; Ooss 
Country 3, \: Captain 1; Tennis t; Basketball 
Manager 4: Senior Christmas Party Commit lee 
4. Class Prophecy Committee 4. 

.1 lil tie bii of fun is welcomed cveryielierc. 



MARIE J. VICKERY 

"Junk" 

Weymouth Landing Business Course 

Baseball 4: Volley Ball 1, 2. 4: Basketball 4; 
Gym Exhibition 4. 

It lix study when there are so mam othei things 
to do? 



RUTH M. WHEELER 

"Ruthie" 

East Weymouth Business Course 

Student Council 1,2,3,4: Secretary 4; Freshman- 
Senior Party Committee 4; Lunch Room Duty 
1, 2, 3. 1; Certificate and Shorthand Pin in 
Gregg Contest 4: Senior Class Play 4. 

Lovely to look at, delightful to know 



MARGUERITE 

"Margie" 
Fast Wc\ mouth 



M. VILLANOVA 

"Peggy" 

Business Course 

1; Baseball 3; 



4-H Club 
Ball 1. 



Gym Exhibition 1, 3: 

Basketball 1 . 3; Volley 

./ quiet girl \ou think you see. 
When you lake <i look ill me. 



FRANCES L 

"Fran" 
Fast Weymouth 

Cheei Leader 3, 1 
Duty 1 : Glee Club 
The 



WHITCOMB 

"Babe" 
Business Course 
Basketball 1; Lunch Room 
- 3- 

life of the parly wherever she goes. 



DOROTHY \\ ADMAN 

"Dot" "Dottie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Harmony Club 1. 2: Operetta I shei 3: Operetta 
1. \: Gregg Shorthand Theory Certificate 4; 
Chairman Decorating Committee Senior Prom 
I ; Glee Club 1 . 2,4. 

Beauty, pefsonality, and wit, 

Each of these exactly fit. 



ROBERT WILKIE 

"Bob" "Flash" "Speed" 
Fast Weymouth Business Couisc 

Senior Freshman Party Committee 4; Class 
Banquet Committee 4; Gym Exhibition 2. 
Constant and dependable. 



BERN ICE A. WARMBOLD 

"Bernie" "Penny" 
East Weymouth Business Course 

Opetetta Usher 4; Gregg Shorthand Theory 
Certificate 1; Harmony Club 1. 

Why study history? I make il 



ELEANOR M. WILLIAMSON 

"Blondie" 

South Weymouth Business Course 

Book Club 3. |. 

Sure, steady, serene calmness. 



GEORGE A. WARREN 

North Weymouth Technical Course 

Tiack 1, 2; Class Basketball 1. 2: Gym Exhibi- 
tion 1: Class Banquet Committee |: Senior 
Prom Committee 4: Class Nominating Com- 
mittee 1: Senior Class Play \. 

Mathematics requires extensive study. 



WILLIAM WILLINDER 

"Sir Willy" "Hill" 
We\ mouth Heights Business Course 

Senior Prom Committee |: Debating Club \: 
Wrestling 1. 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 1: Golf 3: 
Basketball 1. 2, 3. 4: Operetta 3. 

"II I could only dance forever!" 



77 



BARBARA WING 

"Barb" "Bar by 
South Weymouth Business Course 

(■\m Exhibition 1; Student Council i, ;;. 4; 
Harmony Club 1; Senior Reception Decorating 
Committee 3; Usher at Musical Revue 2: Gregg 
Shorthand Theory Certificate j; too Words a 
Minute Gregg Transcription Certificate t; 
Chairman of Decorating Committee of Student 
Council Dance 4: Chairman of Class Outing 
Committee j: Reflector Staff 2. 3, \: Glee Club 
1: Music Accompanist 2; Student Council Dance 
Comimttee 3; Program Seller at Thanksgiving 
Football Game 2: Lunch Room Duty 1. 3. 4. 
In ever-living fountain of joy and gladness. 



ROBERT WOODCOCK 

" Woody" 

Weymouth Landing Technical Course 

( lass Historv Committee |: Radio Club |: Art 
Stair of the Reflector 3. 

From the cockpit of my plane, I view the world. 



GEORGE F. WOOTEN 

"Red Sox" "Jorge" 
Fast Weymouth Business Course 

Gym Exhibition 2; Class History Committee 4. 
.In ardent baseball fan. 



CHARLES WORKMAN 
East Weymouth Agricultural Course 

Four— H Club: Basketball. 

Shy until you know him. 



J. RUSSELL BEAN 

"Beanie" 

South Weymouth Cabinetmaking 

Vice President of Class; Student Council 4; 
Teachers' Play Scenery 1, 2, 4; Operetta 1. 2. \: 
Senior Play Scenery 1, 2, 4; Exhibition 1, 2. 

He thinks too much. 
He talks too little. 



LOUIS J. BELCASTRO 

"Louie" 

Past Weymouth Auto Repaii 

( lass Nominating Committee \: Exhibition t, \. 
Slow and steady wins the race. 



ROBERT W. BURNS 

"Scotty" 

South Weymouth Auto Repair 

Senior Prom \; Exhibition 1. |. 

Eat, drink, and be merry. 



WILLIS E. BURNS 

"Will" 

Past Weymouth Cabinetmaking 

Basketball 1, 2; Exhibition 1, 2; Baseball 2. 3; 
( lass Nominating Committee \: reachers' l'la\ 
Scenery 1. 2. 4. 

./ country gentleman. 



JOSEPHINE M. YORK 

"J6" 

North Weymouth Business Course 
Book Club \. 

Calm and reserved. 



JOHN F. COLLINS 

"Johnny" 

North Weymouth Printing 
Exhibition i. 2; Class Nominating Committee 1. 



Too inuili schooling is a dangerous ih 



nil 



MILDRED ZEOLIE 

"Miilie" 

Past Weymouth General Course 

Clothing Committee 4. 

A peaceful, happy maiden. 



MICHAEL COREY 

"Mike" 



South Weymouth Auto Repa 

Baseball i, 2: Senior Prom Committee |. 
"Quiet! I'm concentrating." 



79 




8o 



WILLIAM J. DALEY 

"Will" 

East Weymouth Auto Repair 

( hiss Outing Committee 4; Brockton Fair Ex- 
hibition 2: Class Exhibition 1, 2, 4. 

Where there's a will, /here's a zuay. 



HAROLD S. KOSONEN 

"Blondie" 

East Weymouth Printing 

Exhibition 2, 4; Class Prophec\ Committee \: 
Class Banquet Committee 4. 

A good sport and a genuine pal. 



JOSEPH W. DURANT 

"Novey 

North Weymouth Auto Repair 

Class l'rophecv Committee 4: Who's Who Com- 
mittee 4: Exhibition 1. 2. 4: Brockton Fair 
1 xhibition 2. 

Speak to him, girls, see if you can move him. 



GEORGE W. GALLANT 

"Willie" 

Weymouth Landing Printing 

Honor Roll 1; Exhibition 1. 2: Graduation Re- 
ception Committee 4: Class Motto Committee 4. 

Why don't women leave me alone? 
LOUIS GRANT 

"Popeye" 

East Weymouth Printing 

Basketball 1: Class Banquet Committee 4; Ex- 
hibition 2. 4. 

He never makes any noise— oh , yeah? 

GEORGE L. INGLIS 

"Georgie" 

Rockland Auto Repair 

Clothing Committee 4; Exhibition (.. 

Does lie blush, girls? 

CLARENCE A. JERMVX 

"Wisdy" 

Hingham Sheet Metal 

Honor Roll 4; Basketball \; Exhibition 4. 
Xitr manners and a winning way. 

Si 



W ALTER K. MARSH 

"Wally" 

Weymouth Landing Auto Repair 

Baseball 1. 2. 4; Basketball 1, 2, 4: Senior Play 
4; Class Exhibition 1, 2, 4; Lights at Operetta 
2, 3; Lights at Senior Play 2; Freshman Senior 
Party. 

An all-round sport. 

LEO T. O'HARE 

"O'Toole" 

Rockland Printing 

Class President 4; Baseball 4; Freshman Senior 
Party Committee 4; Christmas Party Committee 
4; Honor Roll 2; Student Council 4; Exhibition 
2, 4- 

He is sure to be surrounded by an admiring 
multitude. 

FRANCIS H. PECORARO 

"Pickles" 

East Weymouth Printing 

Baseball Manager 4; Basketball 1; Class Proph- 
ecy Committee 4; Graduation Reception Com- 
mittee 4; Exhibition i, 2, 4. 

A man who blushes isn't quite a brute. 

GEORGE H. ROBERTS 

"Georgie" 

East Braintree Printing 

Reflector Staff 4; Honor Roll 2. 4: Class History 
Committee 4: Exhibition 2, 4 

Work first then plax. 

LAWRENCE H. SMITH 

"Smitty" 

North Weymouth Cabinetmaking 

Basketball Manager 2. 4; Student Council 4; 
Teachers' Play Scenery 1. 2, j; Operetta 1. 2. 4; 
Senior Play 1, 2. 4: Exhibition 1. 2. |: Class 
Outing Committee 4. 

A finished gentleman from top to toe. 



Zano Spada 



I'inil Slrlla 





2 







II «/ ren Tribou 



Louis II eiis 



ZANO SPADA WARREN L. TRIBOU 

"Ze/<e" "War" 

East Wcymoutli Printing North Weymouth Cabinetmaking 

Baseball 2, 4; Who's Who Committee 4; Exhi- Teachers' Play Scenery i, 2, 4; Senior Play 

bition 2, 4. Scenery 1, 2. j: Exhibition 1, 2: Operetta 4. 

Anything but a quiet life for him. A man of mind. 



PAUL F. STELLA LOUIS J. WELLS 

"Shady" "Louie" 

East Weymouth Auto Repair East Weymouth Auto Repair 

Baseball i, 2; Class Prophecy Committee 3; Baseball 1; Baseball Manager 2; Brockton Fair 

Exhibition 1, 2. Exhibition 2; Class Exhibition 1, 2. 

He thinks the most good and speaks the least A good sport and a good friend, 
ill of his neighbors. 



82 



Class Census 



Most Popular Girl Marguerite Starkey 

Most Popular Fellow Paul Roche 

Wittiest Edwin Bassett 

Prettiest Girl Lenna Palmer 

Glass Sheik Paul Johnson 

Glass Comedian Grace Stevens 

Class Bookworm Ralph Hunter 

Class Musician Charles Hegarty 

Class Baby Marguerite Howsberger 

Class Actor Roger McAleer 

Class Actress Ingrid Monk 

Class Artist Peter Logan 

Class Heartbreaker Robert Jorgensen 

Most Dependable Margaret Joyce 

Most Carefree Stanley Leary 

Best Dressed Girl Frances Whitcomb 

Best Dressed Fellow Edward Madden 

Most Popular with the Ladies J onn Mehrman 

Most Popular with the Men Ruth Wheeler 

Woman Hater Elmer Hollis 

Class Poet Mary Rockwood 



*3 




c 



tlVitl 



First Row: Dorothy Wells. Nancy Fielding. Barbara Wing. Ralph Sweeney. Mr. Brown, Anne Toomey, Peter 
Logan, Priscilla Dunn. Elena Caracciolo; Second Row: Alice Murray. Margaret Holmes, Gladys Dwyer, Alice 
Long, Irene Gorman. Shirley Pingree, Dorothy Parker. Lea Tacc'nnelli. Maigaret Don:. hue, Mary Virginia 
Wallace; Third Row: Laura Passero. Marie Garafolo, Mary Lam be, Rita Kcarns, Rose Lipsky, Concetta 
Passero, Rita Bowie, Natalie Kosarick, Elizabeth Ellard; Fourth Row: Doris O'Connor. Constance O'Neil, 
Shirley Hart, Mary Hayes. Anagret Hayes sen, Jean Condon, Barbara Itairheldir. Helen McGrory; Fifth Row: 
Robert Coleman, Kirby Weathersbee. 



he staff of the Reflector has concluded its duties for the school year of 



1938-1939. During this time lour issues and a year book have been pub- 



lished. We have endeavored to have the publications reflect the best thoughts 
and ideas of all the pupils by choosing the highest grade materials offered from 
all the classes. We have worked hard to attain a high standard, but it has been an 
enjoyable and educational task. We hope our efforts have provided the students 
with an interesting and varied magazine. 

Members of the staff attended meetings of the Southeastern Massachusetts 
League of School Publications at Plymouth, Milton, and Duxbury. At these meet- 
ings, the exchange of ideas, the lectures, and the entertainment provided were en- 
joyed by all. In May, the Reflector was host to the staffs of the other school papers 
of the league. 

We, of the Reflector stall, wish to thank our faculty adviser, Mr. Presott B. 
Brown for his helpful counsel. We are deeply appreciative of his kindness and un- 
tiring service. We are grateful to our teachers for their assistance and to the 
students for their willing co-operation. A vote of thanks is also due Mr. Harry 
F. Duncan, printing instructor at the Vocational School, for his every-ready aid. 

May we extend to the staff of next year's Reflector our best wishes for success 
and the hope that they will find in their work the pleasure and benefit we have 
found in ours. 





86 




First Row: Velma Collyer. Margaret MacDonald. Louis Lysakowski, Bruce Fox, Ruth Wheeler, Barbara Wing; 
Second Row: Louise Jannell, Ruth Stub, Doris O'Connor. Portia Stanton, Doris Barnes, Catherine Anderson, 
Virginia Doyle; Third Row: Stanley Sulis, James Orcutt, Earl Yetman, John Delorey, Joseph Lambe, George 
Reed. 



Student Council 

The eighth successful year of the Student Council has just been completed. It 
was organized in 1931 under the direction of our principal, Mr. Whittle. Its 
purpose is to discuss school problems, to help in maintaining good order, and 
to give each member an opportunity for leadership. 

Instead of the usual two representatives from each home room, the mem- 
bership has been limited for greater efficiency to five members from each class. 
Those who have served as officers for the school year 1938-1939 are: 
President, Louis Lysakowski 
Vice President, Bruce Fox 
Secretary, Ruth Wheeler 
The system of rotary traffic, adopted last year, was efficiently carried out this 
year. In this way, teachers are relieved from their duty in the halls and orderly 
conduct is maintained throughout the corridors. Monitors are also stationed on 
the stairs and in the lunchroom. 

A dance was held in December by the association, the proceeds of which will 
be used for athletic ecjuipment. 

One of the council's outstanding accomplishments is the annual publication 
of the Maroon and Gold Manual under the able direction of (Mrs.) Dora S. 
White. This book is given to all freshmen to acquaint them with the history, 
organization, and rules of the high school. 

May our Student Council continue to prosper in the future, and may it con- 
tinue to be a helpful influence in the betterment of our school. 



87 



The Chimes of Normandy 



88 



The annual production for 1939 offered by the Glee Club, under the direction 
oi Mr. John Lyons, ably assisted by Misss Ernestine Canning and Miss Anita 
Petrucci, was the operetta entitled "The Chimes of Normandy" by Robert 
Planquette. 

The story of the operetta centers around the mystery concerning the haunted 
Chateau cle Corneville. There was a legend abroad that only on the return of 
Henri, the voting Count de Corneville, in exile since childhood because of civil 
Avar, would the chimes ring. Since the day that he had saved the life of Germaine, 
the niece of the old miser Gaspard, he had remembered the brilliancy of her eyes 
as she had told him the legend of the bells. However, Gaspard, who did not rec- 
ognize Henri as the young count, tried to force Germaine to marry the Magis- 
trate of the District. In order to escape the power of old Gaspard, she went to the 
annual fair, then taking place in the little village and engaged herself as a servant 
of the Count. Meantime, Henri was determined to learn the truth regarding the 
apparitions in the old castle, and he found that the old miser Gaspard was respon- 
sible for them as he had concealed his treasures there. This fact drove Gaspard 
mad. especiallv when he heard the bells of the castle ring out. As the story went 
along, it developed that Germaine was the real heiress, the true Marchoncss, 
whose identitv was proved by a locket, an heirloom of the family of the Marquis, 
which she had worn since her childhood. The truth was then revealed that it 
was Henri who had saved her from drowning. Thus, at the end of the story, the 
hero Henri and the heroine Germaine are brought together and all ends happily. 
Those taking part in the operetta were as follows: 



HENRI 


Joseph Mercurio 


GERMAINE 


Dorothy Wadman 


SERPOLETT1. 


Portia Stanton 


GASPARD 


Walter Easttey 


THE B VILLI 


Alton Blanchard 


GERTRUDE 


Irene Gorman 


MANETTE 


Cynthia Cowing 


SPECIALTV DANCE 


Bette Dizer 


SKELETON DANCE 


Patricia Butler 




Marjorie Chase 




Bette Dizer 




Marjorie Dizer 




Elaine Gaskill 




Marie Kezer 




June Newcomb 




Eleanor O'Lcary 



The Weymouth High School Orchestra, under the leadership of Mr. James W. 
Calderwood, furnished the music for the performance and the additional numbers 
given between the acts. 

Teachers and students of all departments deserve much credit for the way in 
which they cooperated to make this annual presentation the usual success. 



89 



Under the careful direction of Mrs. McGrath, "You Can'l Take It With You," 
a comedy hit written by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman, was presented 
by members of the Senior Glass on June 2, 1939. 
The play is set 111 the home of Martin Vanderhof, a retired business man. Each 
and every member of the family is an individualist who does as h< pleases, with 
no questions asked. George Warren played his bit as "Grandpa" Vanderhoi rath- 
er cleverly, bringing out the Eacl that "Grandpa" was now living idh and hap- 
pih. Mrs. Penny Sycamore, an up and coming playwright, who always seemed to 
sa\ the wrong word at the wrong time, was portrayed extremely well by Pegg\ 
Holmes. Gordon Holder took the part of Mr. Paul Sycamore, Pennv's husband, 
who is epiite interested in fireworks. Ingrid Monk and James McFarland, as Alice 
Sycamore and Tony kirby, did a fine bit of acting in portraying the lovers. Essie 
Carmichael, a rather ambitious but "dumb" ballet dancer, was nicely represented 
by Ruth Wheeler. Ed, her husband, was played by Edward Bassett. 

Cornelia Bowie and Charles Goodale both played their parts well, the latter 
being a zealous business man. Paul Kirby; the former being a rather too, too 
snobbish, Mrs. Kirby. Roger MacAleer added amusement and laughter to the 
play, as the Russian dance teacher, Kolenkhov. Walter Marsh and Marjorie Dur- 
gin played their parts as Donald and Rheba, the servants, comically, as was pre- 
scribed. 

The rest of the cast included Elena Caracciolo as the Duchess Olga Katrina, 
who by some turn of fate was employed as a waitress at a restaurant, Joseph 
Callahan as Henderson, the income tax collector, and Edward Dwyer, William 
Hill, and Albert Crossman as the G-men. 



91 




Sitting: W. Sevigny, J. Wooten; Front Row: Vincent Cirgiliano. Robert Crawford. Frank Meehan. Joseph 
Crehan, Coach Harry Arlanson, Louis Lysakowski, Harold Bilker; Second Row: Joe Ross. George Delorey, 
Alphnnse Rakish. Fred Slattery, Russell Badger, Alan Sampson. Raymond Huchan. Jamei Panetta, Edward 
Dwyer; Back Row: Guido Cavallo, Dominick Nista, Ralph Antonetti. Avilio DiGravio. Raymond Badger, Bill 
Burns, Preston Barry, Mario Gatto, James Consentino, Ralph Peters. 



Football 



9= 



Belmont (Home) 

Preventing Belmont from scoring in the first half only by Crehan's punting, 
the inexperienced Weymouth team suddenly found itself, and in the second half 
completely outplayed their stronger rivals. Cirigliano scored in the third period: 
but, after a Weymouth fumble and several long passes. Belmont finally won the 
game in the last three minutes. (6-7) 

Whitman (Away) 

Spotting Whitman 7 points in the second period, Weymouth High, witli a well- 
drilled and now confident attack, came horn behind to win on touchdowns In 
Cirigliano on a (30-yard spinner) and Delorey by a line (buck) (13-7) 

Milton (Home) 

Weymouth simply outclassed Milton. Buker scored on a pass onto the end zone 
from Crehan. (8-2) 

No. Quincy (Home) 

Weymouth's best performance. Weymouth took North's first punt on their 20- 
yard line, and marched to a touchdown in 12 plays, climaxed by Crehan's 30-yard 
pass to Buker in the end zone. In the second period Crehan scored on a diving 
catch of a 30-yard pass in the end-zone, thrown by Delorey. 

Watertown (Away) 

Watertown proved Weymouth's weakest opponent, a very poorly developed out- 
fit. Crawford scored in the first quarter on a 70-yard run-back of an intercepted 
pass. Delorey scored in the last period, at the end of a long march, on a buck. 

Quincy (Away) 

Weymouth fought its favored opponent to a no-score draw. Both teams kicked 
away their few scoring threats. Quincy had a big edge on yardage but Weymouth 
came the closest to scoring. 

Braintree (Away) 

Highly favored Weymouth nearly lost this one, as they were held to a tie by a 
rough playing Braintree eleven. The terrific physical beating injured six Wey- 
mouth players, Crehan scored in the last minute and Delorey rushed the point. 
(7-7) 

Plymouth (Away) 

Weymouth took Plymouth's best team in years in a fine game Crehan, on a 
pass, and Delorey, on a buck, did Weymouth's scoring. (13-6) 

Hingham (Home) 

Weymouth was outplayed and outfought by a fast Hingham team on a very 
cold, raw field. The only score came in the second quarter on a 75-yard run-back 
of an intercepted pass by the fleet Allegra of Hingham. (0-6) 



93 



First Row: William Hums. Fretl Slattery, Coach Arlanson. Joseph Ross. Joseph Callahan; Second Row: 
(K'oi-ne Delorey, William Desmond. Edward Corridan. Thomas Kelley. George Eccobacci, George Anderson; 
Third Row: Harold Buker, Preston Harry. Joseph Cretan, Harold Sullivan. James Fitzpatrick; Fourth Row: 
James Wheeler, Warren McKinnun, Frank Pecoraro, James Wooten. Raymond Benedetti, Francis Farren, 
Walter Roberts. 



Baseball 



Tin: team has had a successful season so far in winning four games in six 
played. The first game was with Brockton, at Weymouth which we won by 
score of \ to 2. Another victory followed, when we defeated North Quincy 
by a score of 7 to 6. Whitman was the victor on their own field winning 10 to 3. 
The next game brought Braintree to Weymouth, where the Maroon team won 
again by the score of 10 to 2. On May 15 the Weymouth boys hit three home- 
runs in winning over Hingham 1 1 to 3. The last game available for this record 
was a close contest with Brockton which was lost 1—0. 




94 



First Row: Walter Kosarick. Eugene Young, Charles Hegarty. Gus Spurr, Robert Raymond, Robert Sargent; 
Second Row: Frances Thomas, Stella Parsons, Doris Barnes, Jean JIacAfee, Grace Jones; Third Row: Paul 
Roche, William Spurr, Robert Gay, Joseph McKenzie. 

Orchestra 

The High School Orchestra under the direction of Mr. James W. Calder- 
wood made its first public appearance at a meeting of the Monday Club 
last November. During the course of the year the orchestra has played at the 
high school for the Monday Club Play, the teachers' play, the Southeastern 
Massachusetts League of School Publications Convention, the High School 
Operetta, the Brainway Players, and at South Weymouth for the Old Colony 
Club play. 

The orchestra closed a successful season by playing at the Senior Play on 
June 2. Although several members will graduate in June, Mr. Calderwood hopes 
for another pleasurable and profitable school year, when the membership will 
undoubtedly be increased by new members. 



95 



First Row: Marjorie Leonard, Sylvia Steele, Eleanor Abbott, Virginia Collins, Cynthia Cowing, Lillian 
Litchfield. Elizabeth Foley. Ida Hosmer; Second Row: Kenneth MacLeod. Kenneth Laramine, Dorothy Parker, 
Dorothy Vanasse, Marjorie Dizer, Grace Loud, Marjorie Roberts, Charles Hegarty, Howen liuckman; Third 
Row: Kdward Poiricr, (ieorge (ilostcr. James Vanassc, Alfred Thomson, Paul Roche, Warren Pearson, John 
Hoffman, Robert Holbrook, (Ins Snurr; Fourth Row: James Dillon, Donald Greene. Albert Nash, Robert 
Raymond. Charles Cavanaugh, Kenneth Parks, Kenneth Weeks, William Illack; Fifth Row: Joseph McKenzie, 
Robert (lay. William Duggan, Merle Silver, (ieorge Frost. 

Band 

This year, after graduation ol main of the members of the band, Mr. Calder- 
wood had to start with a very small nucleus from the former hand. 
The hand, as usual was present ai mosl ol the football games. The last 
game with Hingham, which unloi tunatch we lost, was made a loi easier to lake 
with the appearance ol the long-waited band uniforms <»l die iradiional school 
colors, maroon and gold. At these games the band did many formations forming 
i he letters of both die home and opposing teams. The hand had some new 
additions 10 its repertoire in die lorm ol two new songs written by Mr. John 
Ghiorse and arranged b\ Mr. Norman Loud, both of the faculty. One was the 
new "fight" song Weymouth High. "Fight. Maroon and Cold." The other was the 
"The Cross ol Cray." the first Alma Mater song, it is believed, ol Weymouth High 
and dedicated to the late principal of the school, Frederick Hilton. 

At a banquet given by the Lions' Club at the Hunt School the band was a 
guest. 

Seniors in the band will be the second group ever to receive letters for their 
work, preceded only by last year's class. 

The band will play at the Memorial Day exercises and also at the graduation 
exercises. The Senior Class will sing, accompanied by the band. "Come to the 
Fair" by Martin. 

Those leaving the band this year want to extend their thanks and gratitude 
'o that "grand old music master of Weymouth," James \Y. Calderwood. 

96 




First Row: Richard Totman. Robert Coleman. James Houghton, Moses Sherman, James Coyle. Manning Jan- 
nell; Second Row: Charles Hearn, Russell Tufts, Peter Logan, Joseph Tucci, Joseph Brown, John Delorey, 
Earl Yetman; Third Row: Paul Quinlin, Harold Wright, Lynton Campbell, Donald Drake. Robert Drake, 
Robert Raymond; Fourth Row: Walter McQuade, Alan Sampson, Arthur Weir, William Spurr, Joseph Ouellet, 
Americo Grillo. 



Track 



This year Weymouth High had one of its best track seasons The team was 
composed mostly of juniors, but there are many promising stars of the 
future in the sophomore, and freshman classes. Indoor meets were held 
during the winter season with Dedham, Milton and Quincy high schools. Wey- 
mouth also entered the Northeastern Interscholastic, the Seaboard Relays, and 
the State Meet. Dedham and Milton defeated the Weymouth team but Quincy 
lost to Weymouth with the score of 34-32. 

The outdoor season began on April 28. with Rockland High Weymouth had 
little trouble with this team, the score being Weymouth 48 to Rockland 27. North 
Quincy with a powerful team defeated Weymouth in the next meet on Ma\ 8. 
with a score of 48 to 28. Hingham came next to Weymouth for the third meet 
and was defeated with the score of 49 to 31. On May 16 Braintree defeated Wey- 
mouth with the score of 22 1 j 3 to 62 2 / 3 . Weymuth also tasted defeat on May 23, 
from a strong Revere team, the score being 34-38. One more meet will be held 
with Quincy on May 31. 

Coach Page took a group of boys to the New Hampshire Interscholastics on 
May 6, and he has also entered the team in the Brockton District Meet on June 3. 
Weymouth surprised local track circles by winning the South Shore Interscholas- 
tics on May 20, coming from behind to win in the last stages of the meet. 

Those who were active during the season are: Art Wier, Bob Raymond, Bob 
Coleman, "Rich - ' Totman, Paul Quinlin. "Hum" Sherman. Ben Clark, "Manny" 
Jannell, Jim Coyle, Russ Tufts, Capt. Jim Houghton. Jim Boudreault, Lou 
Gibson, Bob Drake, Don Drake, Alan Sampson, "Bud" Hearn, Pete Logan. Red 
Campbell, and Earl Yetman. Walter Mc Quade was manager of the team. 



97 




First Row: James Nolan, Thomas Kelly, Harold Buker, Robert McArthur, Fred Slattery; Second Row: 
Robert Gloster, Joseph Crehan, Mr. Gannon, Vincent Cirgliano, Paul Smith, Mgr. 



Basketball 

On January j Weymouth lost their first game to Quincy. On the sixth, our 
team journeyed to North Quincy, where it was defeated. The next game 
ionnd Plymouth visiting Weymouth, and we scored our first victor) of the 
season. Then followed two losses to Braintree and Rockland. The team succeeded 
in defeating Brockton on the twentienth and Brookline on the twenty-fifth. The 
next game brought North Quincy to Weymouth, and we were defeated once more. 
On the thirty-first Weymouth travelled to Abington, and lost a close game. The 
next game was with Milton, and was won handily by our team. A surprise victory 
over Rockland followed. Our return game with Brookline was lost on February 
10. The team visited Quincy on the fourteenth and met with defeat. Brockton 
proved too strong for our tired five. Braintree played a return game at Weymouth, 
and won. The final game of the season was played at Plymouth, and was won by 
the home team. Although the season shows eleven losses as compared to five 
victories, prospects for next year are bright, and the team members that do not 
graduate look forward to a successful season. 



98 



First Row: David Sjostedt, Joseph Tucci, Mr. Stewart, James Consentino, Stanley Adukonis; Seednd Row: 
John Vaughan, Louis Lysakowski, Mario Gatto, Arthur Parnaby; Third Row: James Pierce, William Wil- 
linder, Mgr. Donald Drake. 



Wrestling 

Our team this year was the usual success, winning every match except one 
with Quincy, including in the vanquished teams Cranston, R. I., North 
Quincy, Tufts Freshmen, Quincy, and others. There were eleven letter men 
this year and prospects look bright lor next year since only two regulars are being 
lost by graduation. To finsh the season, our wrestlers entered the Tufts Tourney 
and won the State Championship in Class A. 



99 




First Row: Ralph Antoinette, James Nolan, Russell Tufts, Joseph Lambe; Second Row: John La Rocco, 
John Flynn, Philip Ilerlihy, William Hill. 



Golf 

Members of the golf team this year are: Jim Nolan, "Hud" Hill. John Flynn, 
Joe Lamb, Joe La Rocco, Russy Tufts, John Hcrlihy, Anlonette, and 
Salemme. 

The record to date shows only one vic tory for our hoys. The team score has 
improved throughout the season. The sole victory was over Norwood. Among 
other teams played were Framingham, Needham, Brockton, North Quincy, Can- 
ton, and Walpole. 



100 




First Row: Elmer Hollis, William Garrity, Edward Houston, Robert Lang; Second Row: Richard Grisdale, Mr. 
Bates, Ralph Sweeney. 



Boys' Tennis 

Tin tennis team this year, while getting off to a poor start, has constantly 
improv ed and looks forward to its remaining man lies with confidence. 
The first match was lost to Hingham at Weymouth by a score of 3 to 2. 
Another close contest resulted in a victory for Milton by the same score. Quincy 
proved too much for the team in defeating them 6 to 5. There remain eight 
matches in which the bo\s hope to make a better showing. 



101 



\ 



First Row: Helen Evans, Pauline Finn, Jean Macafee. Eleanor Gould; Second Row: Janet Brayshaw, 
Eleanor Bates, June Davison; Third Row: Myrtle Olson, Cynthia Cowing. 



Girls' Tennis 

The members of the team are: Cynthia Cowing, Eleanor Gould, Pauline 
Finn, Janet Brayshaw, June Davison, Jean Macafee, and Myrtle Olson. The 
girls' tennis team has played two matches this season and dropped both of 
them. Hingham was the victor in each case and each match was lost only 
after the keenest competition. They have four matches yet to play and feel confi- 
dent of success in these remaining matches. 



102 



First Row: Shirley McDermott, Aurie Duplin, Gloria Garofolo, Helen Cipullo, Marjorie Fisher; Second Row 
Edith Durant, Patty Church, Christine Lawton. 

Girls' Sports 

Under the capable direction of the Misses Hoag and Peterson, another year 
of girls' sports is about to close. Again this year, as last, the girls were unable 
to play field hockey, because of the difficulty in procuring a field on which 
to practice. 

Basketball has always held the chief interest of the girls, since the winning 
team has its picture in the Year Book issue of the Reflector. There were between 
fifty and sixty freshman girls who turned out for the first practice. These girls were 
divided into teams. The first team Miss Hoag picked out, and the remaining 
teams played it out for second and third places. There were about thirty-five 
sophomores out for first practice. The sophomores had the winning team, and 
as a result get the picture in the Reflector. The seniors were a close second. 

The final outcome of the games played was: 
Freshmen 7 3 4 -43^7 

Sophomores 7 6 i -9574 

Juniors 707 .0000 

Seniors 7 5 2 l 1 ^ 

Besides basketball, the girls play volley ball and baseball. In baseball, the 
girls play indoors, because the boys need the field for practice. But the girls enjo) 
it just as thoroughly as if it were out of doors. In these games, the juniors and 
seniors combine forces, as there would not be enough girls otherwise. 

This year there are only three girls who will receive stars. They are Marie 
Christie, Dorothy Vanasse, and Evelyn MacAndrews. These girls have for four 
years played on all the sport teams and participated in most of the games, and 
shoud be congratulated, because they enjoy the sports well enough to play for 
four years. 

103 




First Row: William Quinlan, Leu O'tlarc. Joseph Sciacca, Walter Marsh. James Vanasse; Second Row : 
Oliver Virta, Parker Hates, Lou Gibson, Mr. Malm. Coach. Howard Maxwell, Donald Ferguson, Waller 
Gagnon; Third Row: Francis Pccoraro, Manager, Arthur Willi-. Zano Spada, liernard Huilenhuys. 



Vocational Baseball 

The baseball season got ofl to a good start when most ol the Student bod) 
contributed twenty-five cents towards a baseball Eund. rhey were given 
passes which entitled them to go to all home games. 

Mr. Joseph Whittemore, who had been coach lor the past six years, was 
succeeded by Mr. Otto Malm. 

A fine team spirit was shown at all the games. The infield drew main 
favorable comments because ol iis snapp) fielding. 

The team had two capable hurlers in Parker Bates and (.us Virta. Both 
players alternated at third base and in the pitcher's box. 

Five freshmen were regulars. 

The team clicked so well dining the whole season that they won six out of 
eight games and expect to finish by beating Somcrvillc and (iohasset, thus making 
the best record for main years. 

Date Weymouth Opponents 



May i Holbrook at Holbrook 20 8 

May 1 1 Somerville Trade at Weymouth 8 9 

May 12 Randolph at Randolph 8 7 

May 16 Cohasset at Weymouth 5 4 

May 17 Quincy Trade at Weymouth 3 1 1 

May 23 Holbrook at Weymouth 18 2 

May 26 Randolph at Weymouth 8 4 

June 1 Weymouth at Quincy Trade 4 3 

104 





Firt Row: James Vanasse, William Quinlin, Parker Bates. Walter Marsh. Donald Ferguson, Lou Gibson; 
Second Row: Eugene Garrity, Howard Maxwell. Mr. Rooth, Coach, Oliver Virta, Lester Hutchinson; Third 
Row: Leonard Xadell. Edmund. Kelley, Clarence Jertnyn. Walter Gagnon, Lawerence Smith, Manager. 

Vocational Basketball 

Wiiii a large turnout of boys willing to practice at night after school, Coach 
|anies A. Booth. Jr., began in November to make his team Erom freshmen, 
sophomores, and one veteran, Walter Marsh. 
We started our season by stepping out of our class in our contest with Hing- 
ham High School, although we came out on the short end. It proved, however, to 
be a (me game and we hope to continue our relations with Hingham. 

As the season advanced, our boys began to shape up and give a good account 
of themselves. 

We finished our season by defeating the Hockamock League Champions to 
the tune of 28 to 26. 

We predict a good season next year, due to the fact there will be a great many 
veterans. Our team included: 



Captain, Walter Marsh 

Manager, Leonard H. Nadell 

John Herlihy 

Dennis Herlihy 

Oliver Smith 

William Baulis 

Lou Gibson 

Oliver Virta 

Parker Bates 

Lester Hutchinson 



John MacDonald 
William Quinlan 
Edward Kelley 
Wanner Ferguson 
Howard Maxwell 
James Vanasse 
Donald Schultz 
Alfred Williams 
Eugene Garrit\ 
Walter Easttey 



10^ 



Chess Club 



Tin Weymouth High School Chess Club mei bi-weekl) in the library through- 
out the Club season from Januar) to June. Officers for this, the third year 
ol the club, were: Douglas MacDonald '40, president; Grace Loud '40, secre- 
tary; l*i i st ilia. Dennison '40. and Frederick Chase '41, treasurers. 

Medals were awarded to champions and runners-up in both the advanced 
and the intermediate groups: Class "A", Barry Gibson '40, and Frederick Chase 
'4 1 ; Class "B", Russell Ford '40 and Grace Loud '40. 
Members included: 

P. Dennison '40; G. Loud '40; 1). MacDonald '40; R. Ford '40; B. Gibson '40; 
G. Keegan '41; F. Chase '41; 1'. Hamilton '41; R. GiSord '41; R. Curtis '40; |. 
Larner '42; R. Watson '42; F. Keegan '42. 



Compliments of the 

ci ass o f '39 



Congratulations, Graduating Girls 


Compliments of 


Look Your Best 




In Our Swirls and Curls 


A FRIEND 


The Lincoln Beauty iSliop 




Weymouth Landing 




AiilJred Holmes, Beautician 





106 






We, the Class of 1939, Weymouth High 
School, country of Norfolk, being of sound 
body and questionable mentality, make this 
our last will and testament. We bequeath the 
following: 



To the Junior Class we leave our intelli- 



1// H 3 




J, gence, cleverness, and self-confidence. 



To the Sophomore Class we leave our 
good will, in spite of the various misfortunes 
which we visited upon them last September. 



To the Freshman Class we leave several newspapers and other instruments 
of torture by which they may defend themselves from unfriendly upperclassmen. 

The President leaves his ready smile and his art of coming late to classes. 

The First Vice-President leaves his athletic ability and his initials on a desk 
in Room 212. 

The Second Vice-President leaves his perseverance and cheerfulness to any 
needly freshman. 

The Treasurer leaves her sense of humor and a sign reading "Pay Your Dues" 
to Room 304, exclusively. 

The Secretary leaves her ability in school activities and a giggle to be used 
only in biology classes. 

The Valedictorian leaves her ingenuity and her willingness in helping less 
intellectual seniors to future Valedictorians. 

The Salutatorian leaves her dependability and a private secretary to each 
member of the succeeding Reflector Staff. 

To Room 212 we leave a pair of crutches for the sculptured mural with the 
broken leg. 

To Room 215 we leave a guard for each door to help Miss Hale in confining 
all nomadic seniors. 

To Room 216 we leave Miss Canning with her cherished hope of more am- 
bitious seniors in the future. 

To Room 217 we leave a time clock for all seniors to punch upon entering 
and leaving. 

To Room 218 we leave Mrs. White's old map of the world, which will be 
found in good condition, but slightly dusty, in the book-room. 

To Room 301 we leave a spokesman to voice the opinion of the class. 

To Room 304 we leave a complete set of asorted riddles and jokes, so that 
future members of 304 may be able to compete with Mr. Hollis. 



107 



Who's Who in the Baby Parade 



1. Ingrid Monk 

2. Mudelon Evirs 

3. Paul Johnson 

4. Paul Roche 

5. Dorothy Wadman 
(3. Eleanor Johnson 

7. Lenna Palmer 

8. Mary Melville 

9. Louis Lysakowski 

10. Eddie Eaton 

1 1 . Mary Joyce 

13. Eileen Vicini 

14. Janet Durgin 

15. Marjorie Durgan 

16. Rose Lipsky 

17. Barbara Wing 

18. Margaret Holmes 

19. Priscilla Rounds 



20. Margaret Joyce 

21. Edith Grace 

22. Dorothy Keniston 

23. Margaret Driscoll 

24. Mary Karaian 

25. R. Badger 

26. Dorothy Slocumb 

27. David Johnson 

28. Virginia DeLoria 

29. Virginia Traverse 

30. Shirley Pingree 

31. Barbara Iliffe 

32. George L. Wooten 
$3. Marie Christie 

34. Frances Whitcomb 

35. Anne Toomey 

36. Antha Phillips 

37. Muriel MacDonald 



38. Ruth Wheeler 

39. Gloria Poinsett 

40. Mary Rock wood 
1 1 . Ruth Trenear 

42. Beverly Jones 

43. Gertrude Bell 

I ). Emily Norkus 
45. Rita Reams 
4,6. Grace Stevens 

47. Howard Demps) 

48. Nellie Karpinskas 

49. Bernice Warmbold 

50. Yvetle Plourde 

51. Eddie Dwyer 

52. Catherine Dacey 

53. Irene Gorman 



The Perfect Senior 



BOY 

Hair: Ralph Sweeney 
Eyes: Walter Marsh 
Smile: Preston Barry 
Intellect: Paul Roche 
Dignity: Gordon Teague 
Sense of Humor: Peter Logan 
Disposition: Louis Ly^akoiuski 
Voice: Tliornas Bell 
Sportsmanship: Joseph Crehan 
Ingenuity: Edwin Basset! 
Complexion: Robert Jorgensen 
Stature: John Mehrman 
Gallantry: William Burns 



GIRL 

Hair: Rose Lipsky 
Eyes: Renee Patmiaude 
Smile: Lenna Palmer 
Intellect: Concetta Passero 
Dignity: Margaret Joyce 
Sense of Humor: Rita Kearns 
Disposition: Gertrude Bel! 
Voice: Dorothy Wadman 
Sportsmanship: Dorothy Vanasse 
Cleverness: Rntli Trenear 
Complexion: 

Margaret MacDonnell 
Figure: Ruth Wheeler 
Gentleness: Alice Long 




AUTOGRAPHS 



Dumbest 

Prettiest 

Brainiest 



Huskiest 
Cleverest 
Funniest 



Just Friends — 



Northeastern 
University 



day DIVISION 

College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the understanding 
of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. The purpose ot this program is 
to give the student a liberal and cultural education and a vocational competence which fits him 
to enter some specific type of useful employment. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles of business 
with specialization in ACCOUNTING, BANKING AND FINANCE, er BUSINESS MANAGE 
MENT. Instruction is through lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, motion 
pictures and talks by business men. 

Collecf of Engineering 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses in the fields 
of CIVIL, MECHANICAL (WITH DIESEL, AERONAUTICAL, AND AIR CONDITIONING 
OPTIONS) ELECTRICAL, CHEMICAL, INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, and ENGINEERING 
ADMINISTRATION. Students select, at the beginning of the sophomore year, the course in 
which they intend to specialize. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan provides for a combination of practical industrial experience with 
classroom instruction. Upperclassmen earn a portion of their school expenses and make bus- 
iness contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 
Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science 



EVENING DIVISION 

(For Men and Women) 

Providing complete courses of university grade, for high school graduates who find it necessary 
to work during the day but wish to study for further advancement. 

Evening Division of the College of 
Liberal Arts 

A special three-year evening program pro- 
viding general education and preparation 
for the day and evening programs of the 
Northeastern University School of Law. Meets 
one-half the requirements for A. B. or B. S. 
degree. Title of Associate in Arts conferred. 



School of Business 
Programs in Accounting, Management, Law 
and Business Management and in Ei gi- 
neering and Business, under instructors 
actually engaged in the fields in which they 
teach. 

73% of graduates hold executive positions 
in business. Preparation for the C.P.A. ex- 
aminations. School grants B.B.A. degree. 
Individual courses available to special 
students. 



Graduates of Weymouth High School may be admitted without examination if grades are 
satisfactory to the Department of Administration 

FOR CATALOG-MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog of the 

College of Liberal Arts 

College of Engineering 

College of Business Adminis- 
tration 



.Evening School of Business 
.Day Pre-Legal Program 
Junior College 



Name 




111 



LOVELL BUS LINES 



INC. 



Transportation Furnished 
For Private Parties 



H EAST WEYMOUTH 

i 
% 

I 
i 

i 
i 

i 
I 

i 
i 



1 

! 

S 
p 



i 



8 



I 

i 

i 

i 



Teleplione W eymou tli 1243 9 



112 



Many South Shore men and 
women have availed them' 
selves of our helpful service 
in borrowing money for fi' 
nancing their boys' and girls' 
further education. 

Perhaps we can help you. Prompt, friend- 
ly service . . . strict confidence observed 
. . . convenient monthly payments. 

You are cordially invited to come in and 
discuss with our officers any desired loan 
you may have in mind. 

WEYMOUTH 
TRUST COMPANY 

South Weymouth Weymouth East Weymouth 

The New 

Central Market 

Bicknell Square 
DELICATESSEN STORE 

Milady's Shoppe 

Washington Square, Weymouth 

Dresses and Accessories tor Ladies 
Children and Babies 
Novelties and Toys 



Auctioneer 



Appraiser 



Telephone Braintree 1875 



ARTHUR E. BOYNTON 
Real Estate Insurance 

42 CO MMERCIAL STREET 
EAST BRAINTREE, MASS. 

A. DE MARCO 
AUTO And TAXI SERVICE 

Cars Furnished For All Occasions 
Tel. Wey. IOII-W 



Washington Sq. 



Weymouth, Mass 



KING OAK 

SERVICE STATION 

Acme Tires 
Lubrication 

570 NORTH STREET 
WEYMOUTH HEIGHTS 

Tel. Wey. 1612-W 

THE 

M &N 

ATHLETIC COMPANY 

Everything for Every Sport 

99 Chauncy Street 
Boston, Mass. 



Compliments of 



HELEN'S 
RESTAURANT 



Washington Square, Weymouth 



113 



J 



Burdett College 



COURSES FOR 
YOUNG MEN 
AND WOMEN 

Business Administration- 
Accounting, Executive's As- 
siitant (for men), Executive 
Secretarial, Stenographic 
Secretarial, Shorthand, Type- 
writing, Bookkeeping, and 
Finishing Courses. 

One- and Two-Year Programs. 
Previous commercial training 
not required for entrance. 
Leading colleges represented 
in attendance. Students 
from different states. Place- 
ment service free to gradu- 
ates. Visitors welcome. 



61 



ST YEAR BEGINS 
SEPTEMBER. 1939 



raimn 



Am an institution, Burdett College is now an 
acknowledged leader in the field in which Its 
work is done. Statesmen, financiers, bank officials, 
presidents, vice-presidents, treasurers, and many 
others holding important business positions are 
numbered among its alumni. Yet its pride as an 
institution rests not alone upon the achievements 
of the illustrious, but upon the accomplishments 
of that large number of men and women who, 
because of the practical nature of the training 
received, now hold respon- 
sible positions in various 
Unes of business in many 
states. 




m m 
■A. 

. r 't>.'j.J.T, 



Write or telephone for Day or Evening Catalogue 



156 STUART STREET, BOSTON 



HANcock 6300 



Beauty Culture 

is an ideal profession 

11 II f red 

is an ideal school 

An entire building is devoted to 
spacious classrooms and lecture halls 
for practical training in every phase of 
ihe arts and sciences of Beauty Cult- 
ture. 

Wilfred has equipped this unique 
training center with the most complete 
and most modern facilities available. 

Wilfred maintains a staff of capable 
instructors to supervise your [training 
and to give you individual attention 
during your training period. And after 
graduation, we offer a petpetual Free 
Placement Service. 

For comprehensive information, 
visit us or write for illustrated Booklet 
EN. 




of 



Wilfred Academy 

Hair and Beauty Culture 



4°2 Boylston St. Kenmore 0880 

Boston Mass. 



114 



The Wilson School 

Prepares students for career positions as Med- 
ical Laboratory Technologists, X-ray Technicians 
Physiotherapists, and Secretaries to Doctors. 

Co-educational day and evening classes. Limit" 
ed enrollment. Free placement. Write for catalog. 

The Wilson School 

285 Huntington Ave., Boston, Mass. 


HOWE & FRENCH 

INC. 

Anderson's Service Station 

^he Friendly Service Station 
Telephone 1996 
349 Washington Street Weymouth 


Hearn's Drue' Store 

BicKnell Square 
North Weymouth 


L. M. MATHENSIN 

Ladies' and Men's Tailoring 
Cleansing - Pressing - Repairing - Dyeing 

153 Washington Street, Weymouth 

Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. 
Wednesdays 8:00 A.M. - 12:00 P.M. 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 
WEYMOUTH TAILORING CO. 

S. Greenblatt, Prop. 

CLEANERS TAILORS FURRIERS 

Expert Workmanship at Reasonable Prices 
Tel. Weymouth 0972 
73 Washington Street Weymouth, Mass 


The Studio Beauty Shop 

Phone 1144-W, 1144-R 
32 ^Jt^ashington Sq. Weymouth, Mass. 


LEONARD'S DRUG STORE 
F. A. LEONARD, Prop. 

1 Union Street, South Weymouth, Mass. 


ERVIN DAVIS. Proprietor Tel. Weymouth 1905 

DAVIS DOUGHNUT SHOP 

Dou'nyflake Doughnuts, Fancy Pastries 

1 } ^X/nshington Scjusrc ^X^cymouth, N/lsss. 
Special Prices on Quantity Orders to Schools, Parties, etc. 


NAPOLEON E. BERGERON 

AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

Carburetor and Electric \\ ? ork a Specialty 
Z"U W asliington Otreet, W eymouth 

Tel. Wey. 1428 


STRATFORD SCHOOL 

For the young woman contemplating Preparation for Busi- 
ness, whose demand; of her school include a distinguished en- 
vironment, an outstanding faculty and a training plan worthy 
of her present attainments. 

POT T FHF OP A OF 
Evening Division and Summer Division Co-educational 
Tel. Commonwealth 8161 
128 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston Massachusetts 


CHESTER N. FOGG 

Jewelry 

71 Washington Streer, Weymouth 


Compliments of tlie 

BRAINTREE SPORTS SHOP 


J. H. .Murray Hardw are Co. 

809 Broad Street 
East \\^eymoutli, .Mass. 



•'5 



Insurance 

South Shore Insurance Agency 

CHARLES H. CHUBBUCK 
45 WASHINGTON SQUARE, WEYMOUTH, MASS. 

Established 1870 

Real Estate 

MEMBER MASSACHUSETTS REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE 
MEMBER QUINCY AND SOUTH SHORE REAL ESTATE BOARD 



PLYMOUTH ROCK 
ICE CREAM 



SERVED EXCLUSIVELY AT OUR CAFETERIA 



"It's Qood for the Children" 





n6 



"Congratulations on a Job Well Done" 

Remick's extends its heartiest congratulations to the members 
of the graduating class and wishes them the best of good health and 
success in the future. 

We hope we may be of service to you in your clothing prob- 
lems, the same as we have helped other South Shore graduates in 
theirs since 1896. We can outfit you correctly for school, gradua- 
tion, the Senior Prom, business and pleasure. 

Again congratulations and good luck, 

REMICK'S 

Athletic 

Equipment 

William Westland & Co- 

1555 Hancock Street, Quincy, Massachusetts 



117 



MAT Da.l t I4S EVE Com horn 7 
LAST COMPLETE SHOW t 15 P M 
M*l 20c . Etc 30c • Ch,ld. c n 10c 



PROGRAMS MAILED 
WEEKLY ON REQUEST | 

SEATS RESERVED 
FOR THEATRE PARTIES 



Columbian Sq-- So. Weymouth 



i TtL.wty, 2T7yf 



FIRST NATIONAL 
STORE 

i r\ i Pleasant Street 

So. Weymouth, Mass. 

MR. A. S. BLANCHARD, Grocery Mgr. 

MR. J. LYNCH, Meat Mgr. 



LADIES .nd MENS 

FORM 4 L CLOTHES 
FOR RENTAL 



READ & WHITE 




DONOVAN DRUG Corp. 

"The Service Stores" 
Weymouth and Hingham 
FREE DELIVERY 



I. BLOOM and SON 

Groceries and Provisions 

Tea, Coffee, Butter and Eggs 

LINCOLN SQUARE, WEYMOUTH 
Tel. Wey.0248 



The Nook" 



5C Commercial Street, Weymouth 

Costume Jewelry, Greeting Cards 
Latest Fiction For Rental 



Tel. Wey. 1183-1184 



Delivery 5 



Godm s Alarket 

Footl tor Particular People 
940 BROAD STREET 
EAST WEYMOUTH, MASS 



118 



Suffolk University 



Cultural and Pie-Professional 

College of Liberal Arts — day, evening and part-time courses leading to A. B., B 
S. and B. S. in Ed. degrees (120 semester hours.) Pre-professional courses 
f 60 hours) for Law, Journalism and Business Administration. Entrance 
requirements, 15 college entrance units. Advanced standing for acceptable 
college credits. 

Professional 

Law School— 4-year day and evening courses. LL.B. degree, prepares for bar exam- 
ination and Law practice. Entrance requirement, 60 semester hours of col- 
lege credits. 

College of Journalism — day and evening courses. B. S. in J. degree, 120 semes 
ter hours (including 60 semester hours of Liberal Arts and instruction in 
all phases of Journalism. ) 

College of Business Administration — day and evening courses B.S. in B.A. 
degree, 120 semester hours (including 60 semester hours of Liberal Arts) 
accounting, advertising, business management. 

Graduate School of Law — 1 year evening courses for LL.M. degree and higher 
professional standing. For LL.B. graduates only. 



Late-Afternoon and Saturday Courses for Teachers 
Special Summer School Courses 
Day and Evening Duplicate Sessions 
All Departments Co-educational 
Combined faculties represent cultural and professional 
instruction of high quality and recognized achievement. 



Call, write or phone CAP. 0555 for catalogs 
Colleges Law Schools 

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR 

Derne Street Beacon Hill 

Boston, Mass. 



NEW ENGLAND 
BUSINESS SCHOOL 

38 NEWBURY STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Operated by 

BABSON'S STATISTICAL ORGANIZATION 

INCORPORATED 

Our students benefit from training which is personally organized by Mr. Roger 
W. Babson. In forty years of active business he has hired, trained, and managed 
thousands of young men and women. His interests include contacts with the 
nation's foremost industries. When enrolling in the New England Business School 
you associate yourself with an atmosphere of successful business leadership. 

To Secure and Hold a Position you are soundly trained in accounting, type- 
writing, stenography, and other skilled business subjects. 

For Future Promotion you are given courses in applied economics, prin- 
ciples of management, public speaking, and other subjects helpful to personality 
development. 

Purchasing Courses are particularly emphasized. These courses are believed 
to be valuable to students both as future business men and women, and as con- 
sumers. 

Trips to Plants are a feature of the School and put you in touch with actual 
working conditions in typical factories, stores, and offices. 

Placement In Jobs is among the School's most helpful activities. Altho jobs 
cannot be "guaranteed", every effort is made to assist competent graduates get 
placed and promoted. A unique Work-Study program is offered to help capable 
students apply their training and prepare for entrance into business positions. 



Students gain a powerful advantage in being trained at a realistic school, — a 
school which is organized and operated from the viewpoint of active business men 
and experienced employers with widespread responsibilities and large payrolls. 

Please address inquiries to 

BABSON'S STATISTICAL ORGANIZATION 

INCORPORATED 

WELLESLEY HILLS, MASSACHUSETTS 



120